Bias and Discrimination

Being ‘Merely Tolerated’ May Put Minority Members at Risk

The implied disapproval that accompanies being tolerated may exact a toll on individual well-being. More

  • Since its debut in 1998, an online test has allowed people to discover prejudices that lurk beneath their awareness — attitudes that researchers wouldn’t be able to identify through participant self-reports. The Observer examines the findings generated by the Implicit Association Test over the past 20 years. More

    The Bias Beneath: Two Decades of Measuring Implicit Associations

    Since its debut in 1998, an online test has allowed people to discover prejudices that lurk beneath their awareness — attitudes that researchers wouldn’t be able to identify through participant self-reports. The Observer examines the findings generated by the Implicit Association Test over the past 20 years. More

  • Data collected from 2004 to 2016 show that Americans’ attitudes toward certain social groups are becoming less biased over time. More

    Paper airplanes with one oriented in a different direction

    Implicit Attitudes Can Change Over the Long Term

    Data collected from 2004 to 2016 show that Americans’ attitudes toward certain social groups are becoming less biased over time. More

  • A small cue of social connection to someone from another group — such as a shared interest — can help reduce prejudice immediately and up to six months later. More

    Young woman and young man, sharing headphones and smiling

    Engaging in a Brief Cultural Activity Can Reduce Implicit Prejudice

    A small cue of social connection to someone from another group — such as a shared interest — can help reduce prejudice immediately and up to six months later. More

  • Interracial contact with other practitioners during medical school may help reduce physicians’ racial bias, improving treatment outcomes for patients. More

    Interracial Contact in Medical School Predicts Less Racial Bias

    Interracial contact with other practitioners during medical school may help reduce physicians’ racial bias, improving treatment outcomes for patients. More

  • Research shows that White people are more likely to perceive a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, although their spontaneous behavior indicates the reverse bias. More

    This is a photo of a black compass with needle pointing the word truth.

    White People Show Race Bias When Judging Deception

    Research shows that White people are more likely to perceive a Black person as a truth-teller compared with a White person, although their spontaneous behavior indicates the reverse bias. More

  • While certain expressions of racism are absent from our world today, you don’t have to look very hard to know that more subtle forms of racism persist, in schools and workplaces and elsewhere. More

    Racism’s Cognitive Toll: Subtle discrimination is more taxing on the brain

    While certain expressions of racism are absent from our world today, you don’t have to look very hard to know that more subtle forms of racism persist, in schools and workplaces and elsewhere. More

  • Employers are likely to abide by laws barring discrimination against gay workers not because they are necessarily afraid of being punished for violating the law, but because these laws send a clear message about acceptable moral behavior in the community, a study suggests. More

    Pride and Prejudice: Reducing LGBT Discrimination at Work

    Employers are likely to abide by laws barring discrimination against gay workers not because they are necessarily afraid of being punished for violating the law, but because these laws send a clear message about acceptable moral behavior in the community, a study suggests. More

  • Working mothers are often offered lower salaries and fewer leadership opportunities compared to working fathers, but this penalty can be reduced by framing women as “breadwinners.” More

    Turning the “Motherhood Penalty” into a “Breadwinner Bonus”

    Working mothers are often offered lower salaries and fewer leadership opportunities compared to working fathers, but this penalty can be reduced by framing women as “breadwinners.” More

Latest Research News

Psychological Science in the News