The Latest Research News

  • Children are more likely to control their immediate impulses when they and a peer rely on each other to get a reward than when they’re left to their own willpower, new research indicates. More

    “Marshmallow Test” Redux: New Research Reveals Children Show Better Self-Control When They Depend on Each Other

    Children are more likely to control their immediate impulses when they and a peer rely on each other to get a reward than when they’re left to their own willpower, new research indicates. More

  • People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social media, even when they don’t believe the information, research indicates. More

    Fake News Feels Less Immoral to Share When We've Seen It Before

    People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social media, even when they don’t believe the information, research indicates. More

  • Babies born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face a heightened risk for social and psychological problems in childhood, scientists have found. More

    Blood Test at Birth Could Predict Children’s Psychological Development

    Babies born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face a heightened risk for social and psychological problems in childhood, scientists have found. More

  • When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows. More

    Under Time Pressure, People Tell Us What We Want to Hear

    When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows. More

  • In a new issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, researchers propose novel treatment strategies, based on advances in brain science, that could help prevent abuse of opioids and other drugs. More

    Innovative Addiction Treatments Hold Promise for Stemming the Opioid Crisis

    In a new issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, researchers propose novel treatment strategies, based on advances in brain science, that could help prevent abuse of opioids and other drugs. More

  • Evocative labels such as “twisted citrus glazed carrots” and “ultimate chargrilled asparagus” can get people to eat more vegetables than they otherwise would—as long as the food is prepared flavorfully, a nationwide study shows. More

    Touting Flavor Before Nutrition Encourages Healthy Eating

    Evocative labels such as “twisted citrus glazed carrots” and “ultimate chargrilled asparagus” can get people to eat more vegetables than they otherwise would—as long as the food is prepared flavorfully, a nationwide study shows. More

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