Checking Off Symptoms Online Affects Our Perceptions of Risk

You’ve been feeling under the weather. You Google your symptoms. A half-hour later, you’re convinced it’s nothing serious—or afraid you have cancer. More than 60 percent of Americans get their health information online, and a majority of those decide whether to see a doctor based on what they find. “Wow More

Risk

  • Reminders of God can make people more likely to seek out and take risks, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that people are willing to take these risks because they view God as providing security against potential negative outcomes. “References More

    Thinking of God Makes People Bigger Risk-Takers

    Reminders of God can make people more likely to seek out and take risks, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings suggest that people are willing to take these risks because they view God as providing security against potential negative outcomes. “References More

  • In order to be able to make sound health decisions, patients need to understand the risks and the benefits that come with medical treatments, screenings, and lifestyle choices. But many people have difficulty understanding the numerical concepts that are essential for understanding risk-benefit information. In a new article, researchers Rocio More

    Visual Aids Can Help People Better Understand Health Risks

    In order to be able to make sound health decisions, patients need to understand the risks and the benefits that come with medical treatments, screenings, and lifestyle choices. But many people have difficulty understanding the numerical concepts that are essential for understanding risk-benefit information. In a new article, researchers Rocio More

  • New experiments show that the experience of thinking fast makes people more likely to take risks. This discovery suggests that some of the innovations of the modern world—fast-paced movies, social media sites with a constant flow of fresh updates—are pushing people toward riskier behavior. An article describing two experiments showing More

    Think Fast! Take Risks! New Study Finds a Link Between Fast Thinking and Risk Taking

    New experiments show that the experience of thinking fast makes people more likely to take risks. This discovery suggests that some of the innovations of the modern world—fast-paced movies, social media sites with a constant flow of fresh updates—are pushing people toward riskier behavior. An article describing two experiments showing More

  • A scientific review shows that a psychological intervention commonly employed to help victims who have just experienced a disaster lacks evidence supporting its effectiveness and may actually be harmful. More

    Weighing the Costs of Disaster: Consequences, Risks, and Resilience in Individuals, Families, and Communities

    A scientific review shows that a psychological intervention commonly employed to help victims who have just experienced a disaster lacks evidence supporting its effectiveness and may actually be harmful. More

  • The swine flu (H1N1) pandemic has received extensive media coverage this year. The World Health Organization, in addition to providing frequent updates about cases of infection and death tolls, recommends hyper vigilance in daily hygiene such as frequent hand washing or sneezing into the crook of our arms. News reports More

    Sneezing in Times of a Flu Pandemic: Exposure to Public Sneezing Increases Fears of Unrelated Risks

    The swine flu (H1N1) pandemic has received extensive media coverage this year. The World Health Organization, in addition to providing frequent updates about cases of infection and death tolls, recommends hyper vigilance in daily hygiene such as frequent hand washing or sneezing into the crook of our arms. News reports More

  • Psychological Science in the Public Interest (Volume 18, Number 3) Read the Full Text (PDF, HTML) Faced with outbreaks of influenza and other vaccine-preventable diseases, parents, educators, healthcare providers, and policymakers around the world often want to know how to persuade people to get their vaccinations. A comprehensive review of More

    Increasing Vaccination: Putting Psychological Science Into Action

    Psychological Science in the Public Interest (Volume 18, Number 3) Read the Full Text (PDF, HTML) Faced with outbreaks of influenza and other vaccine-preventable diseases, parents, educators, healthcare providers, and policymakers around the world often want to know how to persuade people to get their vaccinations. A comprehensive review of More

  • People’s propensity to take physical, social, legal, or financial risks typically decreases as they age, but not in countries with high poverty and income inequality, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Examining data from 77 countries, researchers from the University More

    Older Adults Are Bigger Risk Takers in High-Poverty Countries

    People’s propensity to take physical, social, legal, or financial risks typically decreases as they age, but not in countries with high poverty and income inequality, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Examining data from 77 countries, researchers from the University More

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