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Volume 28, Issue5May/June, 2015

Intertwined Sciences

Watch the ICPS Keynote Addresses: Decoding the Neural Signature of Consciousness Stanislas Dehaene The Lasting Power of Patience Terrie E. Moffitt How Brains Think George Lakoff Years ago, it was common for psychological scientists to talk about the role of genes in behavior without any input from geneticists; they would More

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Volume 28, Issue5May/June, 2015

Strategies for Developing Purpose in Your Research

After my poster recently was accepted for a conference presentation, I called my mentor to share the good news. When I told him I was thrilled to be stepping into the profession, he answered, “Zach, you are a professional.” This caused an epiphany for me: Many graduate students are trying More

Teaching Current Directions in Psychological Science

Aimed at integrating cutting-edge psychological science into the classroom, Teaching Current Directions in Psychological Science offers advice and how-to guidance about teaching a particular area of research or topic in psychological science that has been the focus of an article in the APS journal Current Directions in Psychological Science. Current More

Thoughts on the Future of Data Sharing

A number of policy changes are occurring that could profoundly affect our science, perhaps in unanticipated ways. Unfortunately, many of these changes are being formulated without sufficient input from psychological scientists, even though components of the policies could threaten the protection of privacy, the data quality, the nature of our More

Intertwined Sciences

Watch the ICPS Keynote Addresses: Decoding the Neural Signature of Consciousness Stanislas Dehaene The Lasting Power of Patience Terrie E. Moffitt How Brains Think George Lakoff Years ago, it was common for psychological scientists to talk about the role of genes in behavior without any input from geneticists; they would More

Decoding the Neural Signature of Consciousness

Consciousness has kept philosophers and scientists occupied for centuries. Lofty ideas related to humanity, agency, and responsibility all relate to the thing we call “consciousness”; and yet, we still don’t understand how this elevated concept plays out on a mechanistic level within individual people. Is it possible to pinpoint when More

The Lasting Power of Patience

Longitudinal data from thousands of participants show that childhood measures of self-discipline predict everything from personal income to the pace of physiological aging in adulthood. More

How Brains Think

When we get angry, several bodily changes occur. Our skin temperature rises half a degree (hence the term “boiling mad”). Our blood pressure and heartbeat increase (as if we could “explode”). We also undergo disruptions in our perceptions (become “blind with rage”) and fine motor control (get “hopping mad”). These More

APS Convention Program Brings Science to the Courtroom

Since 1989, DNA evidence has proven that 329 people in the United States — many of whom served lengthy prison sentences — did not commit the crimes of which they had been convicted. Speakers at a cross-cutting theme program at the 2015 APS Annual Convention in New York, May 21–24 More

Werner Named Recipient of Verriest Medal

APS Fellow John S. Werner will receive the 2015 Verriest Medal at the biennial meeting of the International Colour Vision Society, July 3–7, 2015, in Sendai, Japan. Werner, Distinguished Professor of ophthalmology and vision science at the University of California, Davis, is receiving the medal for his outstanding contributions to More

Psychology of Language: From the 20th to the 21st Century

Throughout 2015, the Observer is commemorating the silver anniversary of APS’s flagship journal. In addition to research reports, the first issue of Psychological Science, released in January 1990, included four general articles covering specific lines of study. Among those articles was “The Place of Language in Scientific Psychology,” written by More

Graham, Ceci Elected to National Academy of Education

Past APS Board Member Stephen Ceci and current APS Board Member Sandra Graham have been elected to the National Academy of Education (NAEd) along with four other psychological scientists. Ceci is Helen L. Carr Professor of Developmental Psychology at Cornell University, and Graham is a professor of education and Presidential More

Gazzaniga Receives APS Lifetime Achievement Award

APS Past President Michael S. Gazzaniga has been named a 2015 William James Fellow Award recipient for lifetime contributions to basic psychological science for his innovative experiments with split-brain patients, which revolutionized the understanding of human consciousness by showing that the brain’s two cerebral hemispheres undertake distinct cognitive functions. Known More

Remembering Richard R. Bootzin

It is a great honor for me to introduce this collection of remembrances for my beloved colleague and friend APS Fellow Richard (Dick) Bootzin, who passed away suddenly in December 2014. Dick was 74 years old when he passed. At the time, he was a fully engaged faculty member in More

Design With Humans in Mind

Working in the technology realm, APS Fellow Donald A. Norman helped engineers base their designs on scientific findings about the ways people and products interact. More

Is There a Gender Gap in the Perception, Action, and Cognition Program at NSF?

When academics, legislators, media outlets, and the general public raise concerns about women’s underrepresentation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, they often describe the issue in generalities. This tendency can be deceptive, as there are vast differences among the many STEM disciplines. In more nuanced discussions, engineering and More

Preaching About Teaching

The study of how people learn stems back to the infancy of psychological science, when pioneers such as B.F. Skinner, William James, and Edward Thorndike developed “learning science” with the goal of telling teachers what to do. Nevertheless, true classroom-centered research remains scarce, argues APS Fellow David B. Daniel of More