Members in the Media
From: The New York Times

Why Bilinguals Are Smarter

The New York Times:

SPEAKING two languages rather than just one has obvious practical benefits in an increasingly globalized world. But in recent years, scientists have begun to show that the advantages of bilingualism are even more fundamental than being able to converse with a wider range of people. Being bilingual, it turns out, makes you smarter. It can have a profound effect on your brain, improving cognitive skills not related to language and even shielding against dementia in old age.

This view of bilingualism is remarkably different from the understanding of bilingualism through much of the 20th century. Researchers, educators and policy makers long considered a second language to be an interference, cognitively speaking, that hindered a child’s academic and intellectual development.

They were not wrong about the interference: there is ample evidence that in a bilingual’s brain both language systems are active even when he is using only one language, thus creating situations in which one system obstructs the other. But this interference, researchers are finding out, isn’t so much a handicap as a blessing in disguise. It forces the brain to resolve internal conflict, giving the mind a workout that strengthens its cognitive muscles.

Read the whole story: The New York Times

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Comments

I am a polyglot and I have the ability to work with two languages simultaneously, neither of them being my mother tongue. My two daughters attended French immersion Schools and have done very well in life. Having more than one language is a great asset and any parent who can, should take advantage of any language tuition offered in their childs school. The rewards are tremendous


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