Vaccination

Vials with medication and syringe on a blue table

Behavioral Strategies More Effective Than Persuasion in Promoting Vaccination

A report in Psychological Science in the Public Interest identifies the most effective ways to increase vaccination rates. More

  • Research on vaccination behavior shows that the most effective interventions focus directly on shaping patients’ and parents’ behavior instead of trying to change their minds. More

    Increasing Vaccination: Putting Psychological Science Into Action

    Research on vaccination behavior shows that the most effective interventions focus directly on shaping patients’ and parents’ behavior instead of trying to change their minds. More

  • It's World Immunization Week. The new issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest details the behavioral strategies that scientists have tested to increase vaccination rates across the globe. More

    How Behavioral Science Can Help World Leaders Reach Vaccination Goals

    It's World Immunization Week. The new issue of Psychological Science in the Public Interest details the behavioral strategies that scientists have tested to increase vaccination rates across the globe. More

  • A study examining the cost-effectiveness of nudges and typical policy interventions shows that nudges often yield high returns at a low cost. More

    This is an illustration of a clock in a gear interlocking with a gear that has a dollar sign

    Behavioral ‘Nudges’ Offer a Cost-Effective Policy Tool

    A study examining the cost-effectiveness of nudges and typical policy interventions shows that nudges often yield high returns at a low cost. More

  • Childhood vaccines do not cause autism. Global warming is confirmed by science. And yet, many people believe claims to the contrary. Why does misinformation stick? More

    This is a photo of the word "true" highlighted in yellow.

    Misinformation: Psychological Science Shows Why It Sticks and How to Fix It

    Childhood vaccines do not cause autism. Global warming is confirmed by science. And yet, many people believe claims to the contrary. Why does misinformation stick? More

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