Members in the Media
From: The New York Times

A ‘Generationally Perpetuated’ Pattern: Daughters Do More Chores

It has long been true that women are paid less than men at work and do more of the labor at home. It turns out those patterns start as early as childhood.

Although there are a few signs that the gap is shrinking, a variety of data shows that girls still spend more time on household chores than boys do. They are also paid less than boys for doing chores and have smaller allowances.

One recent analysis, for example, found that boys ages 15 to 19 do about half an hour of housework a day, and girls about 45 minutes. Although girls spend a little less time on chores than they did a decade ago, the time that boys spend hasn’t significantly changed.

Shouldering more responsibilities at home is a big reason women are paid less than men and fall behind men in their careers, researchers say. Achieving equality, they argue, will require not just preparing girls for paid work, but also teaching boys to do unpaid work.

Read the whole story: The New York Times

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Comments

The video “Chore Day” by Three Beat Slide (available for free on YouTube) clearly shows that teenage boys do as much, if not more chores than teenage girls. However, you might want to have your daughter do the dishes instead (watch the video and you’ll see what I mean!).


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