Economic Psychology

Psychological science is making a big splash in world of international development. This month the World Bank announced a new initiative intended to bring insights from behavioral science directly to the forefront of international development. Established in 1944, the World Bank Group employs more than 10,000 employees in more than More

The economist Muhammad Yunus was awarded a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 in recognition for his pioneering work in microlending – making small loans available to people living in poverty. Yunus believed that entrepreneurs in rural, impoverished areas needed the same things as any other business—capital to get their small More

Since the 19th century, immigration and psychology have shaped each other in the United States — for better or worse. Back then, people who attempted to enter the country at Ellis Island faced psychological tests to determine their “fitness.” In the field of education, experts have long scrambled to integrate More

The Washington Post: Economic segregation has some obvious consequences for how we live. It means that poor and rich children attend different schools, that their parents shop in different stores, that their families rely on separate amenities, whether parks or transit lines or community pools. These living patterns, though, also More

Poverty, wealth, and their cognitive, emotional, and neurochemical consequences dominated the discussion in the opening integrative science symposium at ICPS. Moderated by Daniel Cervone, who co-chairs the program committee for the event that kicked off March 12 in Amsterdam, scientists representing psychology, economics, and sociology shared a wealth of research More