Milestones in a Distinguished Career: James S. Jackson

James S. Jackson as a student.

1962: Enrolled as engineering student at Michigan State University (MSU) and later changed major to psychology

1968: Became National President of the Black Student Psychological Association

1971: Hired as the first full-time African American faculty member at the University of Michigan (UM)

Photo credit: The Michigan Chronicle. From left: James S. Jackson, John Conyers, and Thomas O. Hilliard at the 1973 convention of the National Association of Black Psychologists.

1972–73: Served as president of the Association of Black Psychologists

1979: Launched the groundbreaking National Survey of Black Americans

1989: Appointed to the National Advisory Mental Health Council of the US National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)

1995: Named Daniel Katz Distinguished University Professor of Psychology at UM

2001: Won NIMH grant to begin the National Survey of American Life

2002: Elected to the Institute of Medicine

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James S. Jackson speaks at the 2012 APS Annual Convention in Chicago.

2005: Became director of Institute for Social Research (ISR)

2006: Received the APS James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award for lifetime achievement

2010: Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences; embarked on the Race Difference in Physical and Mental Health Disparities study (funded by Robert Wood Johnson Foundation)

2012: Delivered keynote address at 2012 APS Annual Convention in Chicago

2014: Appointed by President Barack Obama to the National Science Board


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