Members in the Media
From: The New York Times

Precrastination: When the Early Bird Gets the Shaft

My baby teeth never fell out. Instead, I yanked them out, roots and all, as soon as they were loose.

I could have saved myself considerable pain by letting nature take its course. But I’m a serial “precrastinator”: I flip pancakes before bubbles have formed on the surface; I get to the grocery store before it opens; I turn in work before it’s due. The urge to complete a task is so strong I forge ahead even when I know waiting would lead to a better outcome.

Yes, this might sound a little nonsensical. But it’s not uncommon.

David Rosenbaum, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, published a study in 2014 in which he coined the term “precrastination,” which he defines as the tendency to tackle subgoals at the earliest opportunity — even at the expense of extra effort.

“It’s like going to the grocery store, loading up your basket with a bunch of apples, then schlepping them with you as you shop even though you know you’ll pass them again on the way to the checkout counter,” Dr. Rosenbaum said.

Read the whole story: The New York Times

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