Cover Story

Talkin’ About Your Generation

Scientists have long debated how economic and societal trends, such as the Great Depression or the 1960s counterculture movement, influence personality development. But using novel ways to analyze data across time, psychological researchers have identified specific attributes — like empathy and incivility — that are more prevalent in some birth cohorts than in others.


Presidential Column

Contributions of Psychology to Psychiatry

Modern psychiatry owes much of its understanding of mental illness to psychological research. In a guest column, psychiatric scholars E. Jane Costello and Adrian Angold of Duke University detail the… More>


Journals, Journals, Journals

As the field’s highest ranked empirical journal reaches its silver anniversary, we republish the inaugural editorial written by its founding editor, the late cognitive psychologist William K. Estes — who… More>


Probing Emotional Mysteries

Studying human emotion is akin to detective work for APS Past President Robert W. Levenson. The 2014 William James Fellow awardee discusses his search for clues in behavior, age, genes,… More>


Faded Memories

Why do some US presidents become staples of history, while others spiral into obscurity as time passes? A new study led by APS Past President Henry L. Roediger, III, helps… More>


Remembrance

Remembering Richard F. Thompson

Friends and colleagues remember a neuroscience pioneer for his tenacity and his dedication to the scientific method. More>


Would I Wait for More Pie?

In his latest book, The Marshmallow Test: Mastering Self-Control, APS Past President Walter Mischel reflects upon how his famous “marshmallow test” informed decades of research on self-control and well-being.… More>


More from the Latest Issue >

Inside the Psychologist’s Studio: Paul Ekman

APS William James Fellow Paul Ekman discusses his groundbreaking research on microexpressions in the latest installment of APS's "Inside the Psychologist's Studio" video series.

More>

The Facts About Prolonged Exposure Therapy for PTSD

In a brief interview, psychological scientist Richard J. McNally provides facts about the evidence for the effectiveness of Prolonged Exposure (PE) therapy.

More>

Perspectives on Psychological Science

Read about the latest issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science.

More>

Perspective-Tracking Brain Response Could Help Identify Children with Autism

Using brain imaging to examine neural activity associated with our ability to distinguish the self from others could lead to a tool for identifying children with autism spectrum disorder.

More>

How a Habit Becomes an Addiction

Barry J. Everitt of the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, outlines neural evidence that helps to explain why 20-30% of drug users descend into addiction.

More>

Processing Speed Helps Determine Whether We Choose Carrots Over Chocolates

Whether we choose a healthy snack over an indulgent one may depend on how quickly our brains process different kinds of information about food.

More>

Inside the Psychologist’s Studio: Claude Steele

In a newly released "Inside the Psychologist's Studio" video, Past APS Board Member Claude Steele discusses his extensive social psychological research.

More>

More Observations >