Cover Story

The Truth About Lying

He’s interviewed criminals, offered students bribes, and given research participants countless opportunities to cheat him. Dan Ariely shares his unique approach to studying the ways people engage in — and rationalize — dishonest behavior. Ariely’s Keynote Address was one of the many highlights of the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, where more than 4,300 participants packed meeting rooms to partake of a menu including assorted workshops, talks, symposia, and special events.


How Rats, Bats, Bees, and People Navigate Their Worlds

Creatures ranging from honeybees to humans possess an innate mental map that allows them to navigate the world. In a symposium organized by APS President C. Randy Gallistel, Nobel laureate… More>


The Parenting Trap

Young children experiment and learn about the world in a manner more typically associated with scientists, as APS Fellow Alison Gopnik has shown in experiments. But those abilities are largely… More>


The Heart of the Matter

Mounting empirical evidence suggests that identifying and affirming one’s values can have benefits across a variety of contexts, including teaching, says psychological scientist and author Kelly McGonigal. More>


On One’s Own Time

This is a photo of APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen.

In various experiments, APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen and colleagues have demonstrated that people’s preferences for deepening relationships and avoiding risks intensify as their time horizons shorten. Carstensen joined APS… More>


Diversity as a Must-Have Feature of Science

The science of diversity can’t be a specialty — it must be fully integrated throughout psychological research, says Enrique W. Neblett, Jr. The clinical scientist was joined by APS Board… More>


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Learning With Amnesia

In a recent study, researchers used the unique experiences of an actor with amnesia to better understand learning in individuals affected by the syndrome.

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PCSAS Accreditation Is Recognized by Veterans Health Administration

Students and graduates of programs accredited by the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) will be eligible for internships and employment in the Veterans Health Administration.

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Science of Implicit Bias to Be Focus of US Law Enforcement Training

The US Department of Justice will integrate findings from psychological science into new training curricula to combat implicit bias among law enforcement agents and prosecutors.

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NIH Simplifies IRB Procedures for Multisite Studies

Beginning in 2017, NIH-funded studies conducting the same experiment are required to use only a single institutional review board to oversee multisite research.

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How Language ‘Framing’ Influences Decision-Making

The way information is presented, or “framed,” when people are confronted with a situation can influence decision-making, even in situations requiring life-or-death choices.

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How Jerome Bruner Transformed Psychological Science

Legendary APS William James Fellow Jerome Bruner, known for his groundbreaking contributions to cognitive, educational, and perceptual psychology, passed away at the age of 100 on June 5, 2016.

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How Collectivism Protects Against Contagious Fear

People who reported greater perceived risk of Ebola infection were more likely to report xenophobic attitudes, but feeling a sense of belonging and connection to others can mitigate this link.

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More Observations >