Cover Story

Burnout and the Brain

Burnout is not just a state of mind. Psychological research that draws on neuroscience and endocrinology shows it to be a condition that leads to distinctive changes in the anatomy and functioning of the brain.


Presidential Column

Psychological Science and Viewpoint Diversity

Psychological science as a field has been focusing on expanding the racial, cultural, and gender mix of researchers. In a guest Presidential Column, APS Fellows Jonathan Haidt and Lee Jussim…... More>


Love in the Time of Twitter

People today are as likely to meet their potential valentines on the Internet as they are at a mixer. Psychological scientists and other researchers are exploring the ways that online… More>


Intelligence Over Time

Children with lower IQs at age 11 are considerably less likely to be alive 65 years later compared with their peers who have higher IQs, psychological scientist Ian Deary has… More>


Hearing With Your Ears, Listening With Your Brain

Whether it’s trying to converse in a noisy ballroom or just coping with a hearing impairment, everyone relies on contextual cues and relevant memories to make sense of what they… More>


The Dos and Don’ts of Wikipedia Editing in the Undergraduate Psychology Classroom

For instructors, the APS Wikipedia Initiative provides a context for undergraduate students to write about psychological science for the widest possible readership. Psychological scientists Christina Shane-Simpson and Patricia J. Brooks… More>


More from the Latest Issue >

Meet Psychological Science’s New Statistical Advisors

Editors for Psychological Science are getting a new tool to evaluate methods and statistics used in submitted research articles: A team of statistical advisors.

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Hebl Wins Top Teaching Award

APS Board Member Michelle “Mikki” Hebl of Rice University has been awarded a top prize for outstanding teaching.

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Replication Effort Finds No Evidence That Grammatical Aspect Affects Perceived Intent

A multi-lab replication project found no evidence that the verb form used to describe a crime influences the way people judge criminal intent, in contrast to previously published findings.

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What the Rise of Large Datasets Means for Psycholinguistics

The rise of Big Data has given rise to new opportunities, such as collecting word variables, in the field of psycholinguistics. It also has raised new questions about large-scale datasets.

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Fuzzy Thinking Gives Adolescents a Clearer View of Risk

APS Fellow Valerie F. Reyna, Rebecca B. Weldon, and Michael McCormick, all of Cornell University, describe how fuzzy-trace theory may provide suggestions about altering adolescents’ tendency toward risky behavior.

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Helping Healthy Habits Stick

A group of prominent psychological scientists outlines specific solutions to help individuals and policymakers maintain healthy habits.

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SBST to Accept Fellowship Applications Through Jan. 24

The SBST is seeking new team members with experience in social or behavioral science for a 1-year fellowship in Washington, D.C. to begin October 2016.

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