Cover Story

Teaching Contentious Classics

Some of the most historic experiments in psychology used methods that today are considered unethical, if not cruel. So do they still belong in psychology textbooks? APS Fellow Carol Tavris explores this and related questions about three classic studies.


Presidential Column

Change Is Coming

Guest columnist and APS Past President Susan T. Fiske discusses how a recent government initiative can change human subjects protection programs for the better. More>


Storytelling From a Three-Legged Stool

Psychology is a science that naturally lends itself to storytelling. APS Fellow Janet Ruscher identifies a trio of critical ingredients for making those stories compelling. More>


A Sense of Family

Humans possess some innate ability to recognize biological relatives — even those they’re encountering for the first time. Scientists are devising cutting-edge methods to advance research on kin recognition. More>


Different Roads, Same Reward

Science is identifying variations in the way individuals respond to their addictions. APS William James Fellow Terry E. Robinson discloses how this research could help identify addicts most at risk… More>


2014–2015 James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowships Awarded

Sight restoration, religious diversity, and cultural influences on visual processing are among the research areas being supported by 2014–2015 James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowships. Recipients of this year’s fellowships are… More>


Introduction to Meta-Analysis: A Guide for the Novice

Laura C. Wilson of University of Mary Washington offers an introductory guide for researchers new to meta-analysis. More>


More from the Latest Issue >

‘The New Statistics’ Video Tutorial Is Now Online

In a new online tutorial workshop, APS Fellow Geoff Cumming explains why it is important for psychological scientists to embrace the "new statistics."

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Perspectives on Psychological Science

Read about the latest issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science.

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APS Fellow Jennifer L. Eberhardt Named 2014 MacArthur “Genius” Fellow

Social psychologist Jennifer L. Eberhardt was awarded a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship in recognition of her outstanding research on the psychological association between race and crime.

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A Closer Look at the Face in Your Toast

We often see images and words where none actually exist. Psychological scientists are taking a closer look at the neural functions behind this behavior.

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Integrative Approach Strengthens Developmental Research

Psychological scientists are beginning to reach across their various disciplines to create a more integrative, inclusive science, using a variety of methods and tools.

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Great Apes Share Our Ability to Predict Goal-Oriented Actions

Great apes' eye movements suggest that, like humans, they can anticipate the goal of another individual's movement.

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OCD Linked With Broad Impairments in Executive Function

A new meta-analysis shows that OCD is associated with broad deficits in executive function, which may underlie the cycle of repetitive and perseverative behaviors common in OCD.

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More Observations >