Cover Story

The Truth About Lying

He’s interviewed criminals, offered students bribes, and given research participants countless opportunities to cheat him. Dan Ariely shares his unique approach to studying the ways people engage in — and rationalize — dishonest behavior. Ariely’s Keynote Address was one of the many highlights of the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, where more than 4,300 participants packed meeting rooms to partake of a menu including assorted workshops, talks, symposia, and special events.


How Rats, Bats, Bees, and People Navigate Their Worlds

Creatures ranging from honeybees to humans possess an innate mental map that allows them to navigate the world. In a symposium organized by APS President C. Randy Gallistel, Nobel laureate… More>


The Parenting Trap

Young children experiment and learn about the world in a manner more typically associated with scientists, as APS Fellow Alison Gopnik has shown in experiments. But those abilities are largely… More>


The Heart of the Matter

Mounting empirical evidence suggests that identifying and affirming one’s values can have benefits across a variety of contexts, including teaching, says psychological scientist and author Kelly McGonigal. More>


On One’s Own Time

This is a photo of APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen.

In various experiments, APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen and colleagues have demonstrated that people’s preferences for deepening relationships and avoiding risks intensify as their time horizons shorten. Carstensen joined APS… More>


Diversity as a Must-Have Feature of Science

The science of diversity can’t be a specialty — it must be fully integrated throughout psychological research, says Enrique W. Neblett, Jr. The clinical scientist was joined by APS Board… More>


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What Is Preregistration, Anyway?

An update to the Psychological Science submissions guidelines explains what preregistration entails, and how the journal is recognizing authors who follow this open-science practice.

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Scientists Challenge Magazine Feature on Historic Brain Research

A group of 200 psychological researchers and other scientists has criticized The New York Times’ publication of a book excerpt, saying it unfairly characterizes the late memory researcher Suzanne Corkin.

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How Friends and Personalities Mix

Close friendships can be rewarding, but they often require hard work to maintain. In a 2015 study, researchers examined the relationships among different aspects of personality and friendship satisfaction.

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Building Better Science Means Breaking Down Barriers

In order to build better behavioral science, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are starting by tearing down walls.

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“Professor Priming” Focus of APS Registered Replication Report Project

A new Registered Replication Report (RRR) will investigate the hypothesis that priming people to think of themselves as professors or hooligans can affect their scores on intelligence tests.

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APS Psychology Jeopardy Contest Wins Big

The APS Psychology Jeopardy contest was a big hit at the Carolinas Psychology Conference. The conference was held April 16 at Campbell University in Buies Creek, North Carolina, and drew… More>

Surprising Authors of Psychological Studies

This is a photo of Lisa Kudrow.

When we think of famous psychological scientists, names like Tim Duncan, Albert Einstein, Lisa Kudrow, and the Dalai Lama don’t typically come to mind.

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More Observations >