Convention Video Blog: Violence Exposure During Childhood Is Associated With Telomere Erosion

The cameras are rolling at the APS 24th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois. Idan Shalev of Duke University presented his research “Violence Exposure During Childhood Is Associated With Telomere Erosion: A Longitudinal Study” at Poster Session V on Friday May 25.

Idan Shalev
Duke University

Terrie E. Moffitt
Duke University and King’s College London, United Kingdom

Avshalom Caspi
Duke University and King’s College London, United Kingdom

Using a longitudinal design we tested the effects of violence exposure during childhood on telomere erosion rate. We assessed childhood adversity prospectively and measured telomere length at two time-points, at age-5 and at age-10 years. Children who were exposed to multiple forms of violence had the fastest telomere erosion rate.


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