Social Interaction

Bragging to coworkers about a recent promotion, or posting a photo of your brand new car on Facebook, may seem like harmless ways to share good news. But new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, shows that self-promotion or a “humblebrag” often backfires. Researchers Irene More

The Sydney Morning Herald: When it comes to popularity, most of us would rather be Glinda than Elphaba. “It’s not about aptitude, it’s the way you’re viewed,” the desired but ditzy witch sings in the musical Wicked. “So it’s very shrewd to be very, very popular – like me!” Yet so More

Social scientists have long known that, statistically speaking, our friends are more popular than we are. It’s a simple matter of math: Because popular people have more friends, they are disproportionately represented in social networks—which guarantees that on average, our friends have more friends than we do. New research by More