Empathy

The New York Times: THIS year, “Giving Tuesday,” Black Friday’s philanthropic cousin, kicked off our nation’s most generous calendar month. Americans punch up their charitable donations in December, to over an estimated $1 billion a day. Why do we give? Many motives drive kind actions. We might donate to impress More

The Atlantic: Throughout my wife’s pregnancy, it seemed like everyone who already had kids was eager to tell us about the changes parenting would bring to our lives. Some were mundane but a little scary (losing the opportunity to shower every day), others profound and hopeful (a powerful new sense More

NPR: Kellie Gillespie is in her early 40s. She lives in London. And until a couple of years ago, she was basically an ordinary person. That was before she took a psychology class with Scott Plous of Wesleyan University. “My life changed after doing Professor Plous’ course,” Kellie says. “And More

The New York Times: COLLEGE students tell me they know how to look someone in the eye and type on their phones at the same time, their split attention undetected. They say it’s a skill they mastered in middle school when they wanted to text in class without getting caught. More

The New York Times: DOES adversity harden hearts or warm them? Does experiencing deprivation, disaster or illness make a person more — or less — sympathetic to the travails of others? You’ve probably encountered examples of each: survivors of hard knocks who lend a compassionate ear to beleaguered souls, and More

The Atlantic: In a column for The New York Times this past January, Nicholas Kristof lamented what he called the country’s “empathy gap,” imploring his readers to grasp the complex circumstances that could plunge someone into poverty. Meanwhile, the psychologist Paul Bloom has argued that a sense of empathy can More