Decision Making

Faces of Black Children as Young as Five Evoke Negative Biases

A new study suggests that people are more likely to misidentify a toy as a weapon after seeing a Black face than a White face, even when the face in question is that of a five-year-old child. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for More

New Research From Clinical Psychological Science

Read about the latest research published in Clinical Psychological Science: The Economics of Losing a Loved One: Delayed Reward Discounting in Prolonged Grief Fiona Maccallum and George A. Bonanno Prolonged grief (PG) is a syndrome marked by intense and prolonged bereavement and is accompanied by significant impairment. Researchers still have much More

What Voters Want

The New York Times: Imagine you’re discussing the presidential election with a group of friends who live in Iowa or New Hampshire. You ask them who they intend to vote for next month. “Oh, whoever’s the tallest,” one friend says. “So Jeb Bush, I guess!” “No way — I’m voting More

Replication Effort Finds No Evidence That Grammatical Aspect Affects Perceived Intent

A multi-lab replication project found no evidence that the verb form used to describe a crime influences the way people judge criminal intent, in contrast to previously published findings. The Registered Replication Report (RRR), published in the January 2016 issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, synthesizes the results from 12 More