Decision Making

How Winning Leads to Cheating

Scientific American: We live, for better or for worse, in a competition-driven world. Rivalry powers our economy, sparks technological innovation and encourages academic discovery. But it also compels people to manipulate the system and commit crimes. Some figure it’s just easier—and even acceptable—to cheat. … Similarly, participants who had simply More

Racism in the Kindergarten Classroom

Pacific Standard: If the current election cycle hasn’t convinced you that racism has yet to be eradicated, consider this: The mere image of a black man is enough to stimulate an automatic threat response in whites. Research has found faces of African-American males are more likely to be perceived as angry, and More

Faces of Black Children as Young as Five Evoke Negative Biases

A new study suggests that people are more likely to misidentify a toy as a weapon after seeing a Black face than a White face, even when the face in question is that of a five-year-old child. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for More

New Research From Clinical Psychological Science

Read about the latest research published in Clinical Psychological Science: The Economics of Losing a Loved One: Delayed Reward Discounting in Prolonged Grief Fiona Maccallum and George A. Bonanno Prolonged grief (PG) is a syndrome marked by intense and prolonged bereavement and is accompanied by significant impairment. Researchers still have much More