Clinical Psychology

New Research From Clinical Psychological Science

Read about the latest research published in Clinical Psychological Science: Blunted Reward Processing in Remitted Melancholic Depression Anna Weinberg and Stewart A. Shankman Few reliable markers for vulnerability to major depressive disorder (MDD) have been identified, despite its prevalence. This may be due to the variety of subgroups and symptom clusters More

This is a photo of APS Fellow Rainer Goebel.

Psychology and Technology: A Premium Blend

Whether they’re conducting industrial/organization studies or analyzing brain scans, psychological scientists are proving to be anything but Luddites. In “Advancing Psychological Science Through Technology,” a cross-cutting theme program at the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, a panel of researchers demonstrated how technology can be used to strengthen data collection More

Diversifying Science to Represent Diverse Populations

Despite increasing attention to issues of diversity in scientific research, participant populations in behavioral science tend to be relatively homogeneous. Understanding how people differ across various dimensions, and how those differences are driven by underlying psychological, biological, and social processes, is critical to building a rigorous and comprehensive clinical science. More

PCSAS Accreditation Is Recognized by Veterans Health Administration

The single largest employer and trainer of clinical psychologists, the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), has announced that students and graduates of programs accredited by the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS) are eligible for internships and employment in the Veterans Health Administration. This action paves the way for More

Workaholism Tied to Several Psychiatric Disorders

The Oxford English Dictionary credits the psychologist and theologian Wayne E. Oates with coining the term “workaholic.” As Oates outlined in a 1971 book on the subject, “the compulsion or the uncontrollable need to work incessantly” can take on obsessive qualities similar to those of an addiction-related disorder. A large More

Neuroticism Predicts Anxiety and Depression Disorders

The personality dimension of neuroticism — characterized by an individual’s tendency to experience negative emotions, especially in response to stress — has been shown to predict several forms of psychopathology, including substance abuse, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders. But does it predict one type of disorder more strongly than the More