Members in the Media
From: NPR

Creativity And Diversity: How Exposure To Different People Affects Our Thinking

There is great comfort in the familiar. It’s one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity.

Social scientist Adam Galinsky has found that people who have deep relationships with someone from another country become more creative and score higher on routine creativity tests.

“There’s something about deeply understanding and learning about another culture that’s transformative,” Adam says.

In one study, Adam and his colleagues tracked business school students during a 10-month MBA program. They tested the students using standard creativity measures at the beginning and end of the school term. They found that students who’d dated someone from another country during the term became more creative. In another study, Adam found that even the simple act of reflecting on one’s deep relationship with a person from another country caused a temporary boost in creativity.

Adam’s research outside the lab echoes these findings. In one of Adam’s favorite projects, he looked at fashion lines presented by major fashion houses over 21 seasons. He found that the time fashion designers spent immersed in a different culture “predicted their entire fashion line creativity.”

Read the whole story: NPR

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