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Volume 23, Issue5May/June, 2010

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This Side of Paradise

Today, Central Park seems as essential to Manhattan as the Empire State Building, the Statue of Liberty, or Woody Allen. But when the street grid for the island was first mapped out in 1811, no plans were made for the 843-acre green sanctuary at its center. The commissioners in charge More

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This Stigma of Obesity

  Linda Bartoshuk University of Florida In the food and health sciences, the medical effects of obesity are well-documented and well-publicized. But, just as obesity may be associated with a variety of health issues, it can also bring a less well-understood effect: stigma and discrimination. In 2005, the battle against More

Marsha M. Linehan

University of Washington APS Fellow Marsha Linehan is a Professor of Psychology and adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. She is also Director of the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics, a consortium of research projects developing new treatments and evaluating their efficacy for severely More

Is Love a Numbers Game?

A number of recent studies have looked at what happens to humans when faced with extensive choice — too many kinds of chocolate or too many detergents to choose from at the grocery store. Under such circumstances, consumer psychologists believe that the brain can be “overwhelmed,” leading to poorer quality More

In Appreciation: Science Writer Constance Holden

It’s a tragic Washington-only event, shocking for the circumstances — a woman killed on her regular bicycle commute home, her bike in an accident with a military vehicle there to protect the dignitaries in town for an international meeting. But as with any such news story, there’s much more to More

Cattell Sabbatical Awardees Announced

Douglas L. Medin and Alison Gopnik have been awarded this year’s James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowships. These awards provide an extended sabbatical period that allows the recipient to pursue new research. They are available to North American university faculty members committed to the scientific study of human behavior and its More

Unicorn Joyrides and Other Rewards of a Doctorate in Psychology

“It’s like you get to ride around on a unicorn and grant wishes.” That’s how my friend Andy described my new job as Vice President of Content Development at The Tech Museum, a hands-on science and technology center in San Jose, California. I have to agree with Andy; the job More

The Changing Landscape for Research Support in British Universities

While psychological scientists in the United States were busily preparing or recycling grant proposals for submission to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) under the American Recovery and Reinstatement Act (ARRA), British academics, including psychologists, have been focused on the RAE, the REF, and More

Behavioral Science is the New Green

Large reductions in energy use are required to avert climate change and strengthen national security. Behavior change — getting households and businesses to reduce energy use through behaviors such as insulating, replacing cars and light bulbs with energy efficient models, and turning off idle equipment — is a source of More

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Building a Psychology Lab at a Community College

Few dispute the importance of introducing undergraduates to the methods of experimental psychology. Unfortunately, the resources aren’t always available to provide access to laboratory research opportunities. The psychology laboratory at Inver Hills Community College outside St. Paul, Minnesota opened its doors to faculty and students on August 24, 2009. Equipped More

A Survival Guide for Your First Review Process

Your initial first author experience in the review process is not unlike setting out to explore the wilderness without a travel guide; you are likely to get lost or, even worse, never return. Even if you’ve been a co-author on another paper, you probably have been spared the brunt of More

A Face Is More Than the Sum of Its Parts

You stop at a shop window and wonder why someone inside is blatantly staring at you — until you realize that person is you. Scenarios like this are impossible for most of us to imagine, but quite common for sufferers of acquired prosopagnosia (AP), a condition hindering the ability to More

Mentoring in Directed Independent Study

Most of us can remember having had one or more good teachers during our education ― individuals who made learning fun, memorable, or easy. A lucky few of us, however, have had a mentor, a combination of teacher and counselor, who connected with us allowing for a heightened transfer of More

Cattell Sabbatical Awardees Announced

Douglas L. Medin and Alison Gopnik have been awarded this year’s James McKeen Cattell Fund Fellowships. These awards provide an extended sabbatical period that allows the recipient to pursue new research. They are available to North American university faculty members committed to the scientific study of human behavior and its More

Champions of Psychology: Marsha Linehan

  APS Fellow Marsha Linehan is a Professor of Psychology and adjunct Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. She is also Director of the Behavioral Research and Therapy Clinics, a consortium of research projects developing new treatments and evaluating their efficacy for severely disordered, multi-diagnostic More