2013 Convention Video Blogs

Social Processes in Daily Life

Michael Roche and his coauthors studied social processes and how they play out in daily life. In their study, college students with a high-dependency or a low-dependency personality reported how agentic (dominant vs. submissive) and communally (friendly vs. unfriendly) they behaved towards others, and how agentic and communally others behaved More

Increased Meta-Perceptions of Agreeableness and Extraversion Predict Partner Satisfaction

Meta-perceptions are defined as judgments made by the self about what others think about the self.  There are certain areas of personality research that may benefit from the use of meta-perceptions in addition to self- or informant-perceptions.  This research predicted partner satisfaction from meta-perceptions of personality provided by a representative community sample More

Grit Versus Aptitude: Relative Influence of Effort and Intelligence in Academic Success

In educational research, an age-old question has remained unanswered: Does IQ or hard work matter more in predicting success in school? Intellectual gifts have been studied extensively, but other non-cognitive factors contributing to success have been less carefully examined. One factor is “grit”, defined by Duckworth et al (2007), as More

Social Networking in a Graduate Industrial/Organizational Program

While social networks proliferate, insight is lacking about how graduate students, faculty, and administration collaboratively engage such networks. In early 2011, University of Phoenix rolled out what has become the world’s largest, single institution, educational social networking site, PhoenixConnect. The authors examined graduate student, faculty, and administrator contributions and interactions More

Developing a Clinical Decision Support System

A Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) is an application that analyzes complex patient data to help healthcare providers make better clinical decisions. While these tools have been successfully used to reduce medical errors and improve healthcare efficiency, they have not always been embraced by providers. David Albert of Columbia University More

Failure to Replicate the Mehta and Zhu (2009) Color Effect

Mehta and Zhu (2009) reported several studies in Science on the effects of the colors red and blue over a series of cognitive tasks. Red was hypothesized to induce a state of avoidance motivation which would cause people to become more vigilant and risk-averse in a task. Blue was hypothesized More