Members in the Media
From: NPR

How Your Brain Remembers Where You Parked The Car

NPR:

If you run into an old friend at the train station, your brain will probably form a memory of the experience. And that memory will forever link the person you saw with the place where you saw him.

For the first time, researchers have been able to see that sort of link being created in people’s brains, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Neuron. The process involves neurons in one area of the brain that change their behavior as soon as someone associates a particular person with a specific place.

“This type of study helps us understand the neural code that serves memory,” says Itzhak Fried, an author of the paper and head of the Cognitive Neurophysiology Laboratory at UCLA. It also could help explain how diseases like Alzheimer’s make it harder for people to form new memories, Fried says.

Read the whole story: NPR

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