From: TEDx

Does Our High School Popularity Affect Us Today?

Psychologist Mitch Prinstein talks about why we are biologically programmed to care about what others think of us, why teenagers first become addicted to popularity, and why being “cool” in high school may be bad for our long-term happiness and success. For the first time in the history of the human species, Prinstein argues, we have become confused about two different types of popularity, and many of us may unwittingly be focused on the wrong one. Mitch Prinstein, author of “Popular: Finding Happiness and Success in a World That Cares Too Much About the Wrong Kinds of Relationships,” is a board-certified clinical child and adolescent psychologist and the John Van Seters Distinguished Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has been the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, the President of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology, President of the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, and a member of the American Psychological Association Board of Directors. He and his research have been featured in over 200 international and national media outlets, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, CNN, Time magazine, New York magazine, The Atlantic, Scientific American, Forbes, Newsweek, Family Circle and elsewhere.

Read the whole story: TEDx

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