Members in the Media
From: NPR

Bringing Up Baby

Bababababa, dadadadada, ahgagaga. Got that?

Babies are speaking to us all the time, but most of us have no clue what they’re saying. To us non-babies, it all sounds like charming, mysterious, gobbledegook. To researchers, though, babbling is knowable, predictable, and best of all, teachable. This week, we’ll find out how to decipher the vocabulary, and the behavior, of the newest members of the human family.

In the second half of the show, we’ll look at the relationship between children and the adults who care for them. Alison Gopnik, a psychology and philosophy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, says parents—especially middle-class parents—view their children as entities they can mold into a specific image.

“The idea is that if you just do the right things, get the right skills, read the right books, you’re going to be able to shape your child into a particular kind of adult,” she says.

But, she says, this view doesn’t align with the research on children’s development. In her latest book, The Gardener and the Carpenter, Alison lays out an alternative way to think about the relationship between parents and children.

Read the whole story: NPR

More of our Members in the Media >


APS regularly opens certain online articles for discussion on our website. Effective February 2021, you must be a logged-in APS member to post comments. By posting a comment, you agree to our Community Guidelines and the display of your profile information, including your name and affiliation. Comments will be moderated. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations present in article comments are those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the views of APS or the article’s author. For more information, please see our Community Guidelines.

Please login with your APS account to comment.