Social Interaction

When the Powerless Rise Up: Power Leads to Positive Action, But Only When Acquired Legitimately

In an effort to reconcile the science stating that power leads to action and lack of power leads to inhibition — despite constant historical reminders of the powerless rising up and taking action — new research in the June issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological More

It Pays to Know Your Opponent: Success in Negotiations Improved by Perspective-Taking, But Limited by Empathy

From the war room to the board room, negotiations are a part of everyday life. Successful negotiations demand a clear understanding of one’s opponent. But what approach should one take to achieve such an understanding of one’s opponent in everyday negotiations? Psychologist Adam Galinsky from the Kellogg School of Management More

Awkward! New Study Examines our Gazes During Potentially Offensive Behavior

It’s happened to all of us: While sitting at the conference table or at dinner party, a friend or colleague unleashes a questionable remark that could offend at least one person amongst the group.  A hush falls and, if you’re like most people, your eyes will dart towards the person More

Proportion of Kindergarten Classmates with Day Care Experience Matters, Study Shows

The debate over the effects of putting young children into child care outside the home has been brewing for years. Previous studies on the impact of child care report mixed findings. Children who are taken care of by nonfamily members at an earlier age, and remain in their care longer More

They All Look the Same: Why we are Unable to Distinguish Faces of Other Races (and Sometimes Our Own)

There’s a troubling psychological phenomenon that just about everyone has experienced but few will admit to; having difficulty distinguishing between people of different racial groups. This isn’t merely a nod to the denigrating expression “they all look the same.”  Indeed, the “cross-race effect” is one of the most well replicated More

The Perks and Pitfalls of Pride

Pride has perplexed philosophers and theologians for centuries, and it is an especially paradoxical emotion in American culture. We applaud rugged individualism, self-reliance and personal excellence, but too much pride can easily tip the balance toward vanity, haughtiness and self-love. Scientists have also been perplexed by this complex emotion, because More