Decision Making

Decisions, Decisions

The themed program “Risky Decision-Making Across the Lifespan” at the APS 19th Annual Convention included a symposium on everything from the neurological basis for decision-making to the wide-reaching societal implications of understanding how we make the myriad decisions we face everyday. Sage or Just Age? According to Ellen Peters, Decision More

The Unexpected Consensus Among Voting Methods

Historically, the theoretical social choice literature on voting procedures in economics and political science routinely highlights worst case scenarios, emphasizing the inexistence of a universally ‘best’ voting method. Indeed, the Impossibility Theorem of Nobel Laureate Kenneth Arrow proved that no voting method can ever satisfy all of his requirements simultaneously. More

“Shoulda, Woulda, Coulda…” New Study Sheds Light on How We Would Have Done Things Differently

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably experienced a shoulda-woulda-coulda moment; a time when we lament our missteps, saying that we should have invested in a certain stock, should have become a doctor instead of a lawyer and so on. Psychologists refer to this process, in which we evaluate how More

Monkeys’ Ability to Reflect on their Thoughts May Have Implications for Infants, Autistic Children

New research from Columbia’s Primate Cognition Laboratory has demonstrated for the first time that monkeys could acquire meta-cognitive skills: the ability to reflect about their thoughts and to assess their performance. The study was a collaborative effort between Herbert Terrace, Columbia professor of psychology & psychiatry, and director of its More