Latest Research News

Thinking of Things Unseen

One of the most distinctive characteristics of humans is probably one you don’t think of very often — the capacity to learn based merely on what someone tells you.  Think about it: new information is most often given to us about entities that aren’t present. For instance, if we are More

Growing In Circles: New Study Examines How Rearing Environment Can Alter Navigation

Many animals, including humans, frequently face the task of getting from one place to another. Although many navigational strategies exist, all vertebrate species readily use geometric cues; things such as walls and corners to determine direction within an enclosed space. Moreover, some species such as rats and human children are More

They All Look the Same: Why we are Unable to Distinguish Faces of Other Races (and Sometimes Our Own)

There’s a troubling psychological phenomenon that just about everyone has experienced but few will admit to; having difficulty distinguishing between people of different racial groups. This isn’t merely a nod to the denigrating expression “they all look the same.”  Indeed, the “cross-race effect” is one of the most well replicated More

Ability to “Tell the Difference” Declines as Infants Age

A new article published in the August issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests that infants fine-tune their visual and auditory systems to stimuli during the first year of life, essentially “weeding out” unnecessary discriminatory abilities. Lisa Scott, a psychologist at More