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Volume 14, Issue2February, 2001
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Volume 14, Issue2February, 2001

Science in Educational Media: Taking it to the (Sesame) Street

There is a tremendous range in the degree to which research plays a role in the production of educational media for children. Many producers rely on little or no research input, limited, perhaps, to occasional consulting by educational advisors or a test of the appeal of a pilot episode. By More

Connecticut College

Overview Connecticut College is a highly selective, coeducational, private liberal arts college. It is located in historic New London, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. The beautiful campus occupies 702 acres (including the 426 acre arboretum) on a hill overlooking the Thames River and Long Island Sound. New More

Decade of Behavior Initiative is Under Way

APS President Robert Bjork and his UCLA colleague Christine Dunkel-Schetter at the Decade of Behavior “launch” on Capital Hill last fall. Behind them is an exhibit on “Stress in Pregnancy and Effects on the Offspring Throughout the Lifespan” based on the work of APS Fellow and Charter Member Dunkel-Schetter and More

It’s a Jungle Out There: Territorial Imperatives in Psychological Science

Consider, for a moment, the similarities between psychologists and chimpanzees. Like their fellow primates, the psychologists muck about a dense, mysterious jungle – only in their case, it’s the larger world of research psychology. Regardless of their neck of the jungle, psychologists spend their days cracking open the same kinds More

NIH Does It Again

For the third year in a row, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) received a large double-digit increase in its annual budget. At a time when partisan rancor has been and will continue to be the hallmark of the deliberative process in the U.S. Congress, NIH is enjoying solid bipartisan More

Depression in Primary Care: Depressing News, Exciting Research Opportunities

When psychologists think of research to improve treatment outcomes for depression, they typically think of efficacy studies: randomized clinical trials evaluating psychotherapies or comparing psychotherapy to medication. As important as such studies are, there is a disconnect with the needs of depressed persons in the community, since the majority of More

On Writing About Psychological Science

Recently a friend of mine described me to his colleagues as a “journalist.” My vague irritation at this designation, which even superseded my pleasure at being called a good one, got me to thinking about the kind of writing I do, in contrast to the kind that my academic colleagues More