Currently browsing "Prejudice"

So You Flunked A Racism Test. Now What?


Observer Article

Law and (Dis)order

Even judges can be duped by false confessions. When APS Fellow Saul Kassin showed volunteer judges weak evidence and a coerced confession — one that shouldn’t have been admissible — they nonetheless opted to convict the imaginary defendant. In a program that also covered misconceptions about lie detection and psychopathy, Kassin, APS Fellow John F. Edens, APS Fellow Essi Viding, Brad Bradshaw, Maria J. Hartwig, and Luke W. Hyde explore psychological science’s role in the legal system. ... More>


Observer Article

Research for Real Life

At a symposium on findings from the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest — a publication tailored for relevance to the general public — Patrick Corrigan shows that society may be able to combat prejudice by promoting the everyday stories of people with mental illness. Maria Kozhevnikov details a taxonomy designed to standardize applied research on cognitive styles. ... More>


Do people become more prejudiced as they grow older?


New Research From Psychological Science

A sample of new research exploring cultural differences in judging competence from faces, acoustic rhythm and perceptual oscillation, and the role of memory consolidation in prejudice formation. ... More>