Latest Issue: Volume 29 Number 6: July/August 2016


Cover Story

The Truth About Lying

He’s interviewed criminals, offered students bribes, and given research participants countless opportunities to cheat him. Dan Ariely shares his unique approach to studying the ways people engage in — and rationalize — dishonest behavior. Ariely’s Keynote Address was one of the many highlights of the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, where more than 4,300 participants packed meeting rooms to partake of a menu including assorted workshops, talks, symposia, and special events.


How Rats, Bats, Bees, and People Navigate Their Worlds

Creatures ranging from honeybees to humans possess an innate mental map that allows them to navigate the world. In a symposium organized by APS President C. Randy Gallistel, Nobel laureate Edvard Moser and APS Fellows Randolf Menzel, Barbara G. Tversky, and Russell A. Epstein discuss how behavioral, cognitive, and brain sciences are charting a new course toward understanding the cognitive map.


The Parenting Trap

Young children experiment and learn about the world in a manner more typically associated with scientists, as APS Fellow Alison Gopnik has shown in experiments. But those abilities are largely thwarted by the modern approach to parenting, she says.


The Heart of the Matter

Mounting empirical evidence suggests that identifying and affirming one’s values can have benefits across a variety of contexts, including teaching, says psychological scientist and author Kelly McGonigal.


On One’s Own Time

This is a photo of APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen.

In various experiments, APS Fellow Laura L. Carstensen and colleagues have demonstrated that people’s preferences for deepening relationships and avoiding risks intensify as their time horizons shorten. Carstensen joined APS Fellows Daniel L. Schacter and Dan P. McAdams and others to talk about time perception through the perspectives of cognitive, social, and developmental sciences.


Diversity as a Must-Have Feature of Science

The science of diversity can’t be a specialty — it must be fully integrated throughout psychological research, says Enrique W. Neblett, Jr. The clinical scientist was joined by APS Board Member Michelle R. “Mikki” Hebl, APS Fellow Joseph P. Gone, and developmental psychologist Lisa M. Diamond to share how researchers are injecting ethnic, gender, and sexual-identity perspectives into their studies.


Changing Habits for the Long Haul

This is a photo of APS Fellow Robert Cialdini.

As research shows, individuals tend to lapse into familiar but unhealthy behaviors during times of stress, says APS Fellow Russell A. Poldrack. In a series of presentations, Poldrack and five other psychological scientists reveal the latest studies on making healthy behaviors more intrinsic and sustainable.


Paying Tribute to Janet Taylor Spence

A year after her passing, scientists celebrate the achievements of APS’s first elected president — including her pioneering work on anxiety and gender identity.


Psychology and Technology: A Premium Blend

This is a photo of APS Fellow Rainer Goebel.

APS Fellow Rainer Goebel has developed software that lets individuals view the detailed scans of their brains in real time — a technological breakthrough that shows signs of helping people effectively control their brain activity. Goebel and a panel of other psychological scientists show how technology is spurring momentous changes in clinical and social research.


Sunday’s Science Smorgasbord

Research on intergroup bias, measurement problems in psychological science, and adoptive parents were part of the feast of science presented on Symposium Sunday.


Scenes From Convention

From APS Past President Gordon Bower to enthusiastic reproducibility workshop participants, the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago attracted some of the sharpest minds in psychological science. The annual photo album showcases pictures from the Psychological Science in the Public Interest symposium, the “Inside the Psychologist’s Studio” interview with APS Past Board Member Jennifer A. Richeson, and other compelling events.


Sizing Up Magnitude

In an interdisciplinary symposium, “The Origins and Consequences of Magnitude Estimation,” at the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, four speakers discussed a diverse sampling of new research on the basic mechanisms and biases that underlie our appraisals and approximations.


Are Neutral Faces Really Neutral?

A symposium at the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago featuring five psychological scientists examined just how unemotional our neutral faces really are and explained how people often derive meaning from these expressionless faces nonetheless.


Tracing the Source of Children’s Racial Attitudes

How children learn about race, ethnicity, and religion depends largely on how their parents present information about different individuals and groups during crucial developmental periods. As part of a symposium at the 2016 APS Annual Convention in Chicago, three developmental psychological scientists examined the important role that parents play in shaping children’s developing attitudes toward individuals from other groups.


Who’s to Blame?

Although bullies, thieves, and swindlers typically draw our scorn, research suggests that the fault we assign in crimes, accidents, and altercations is far more nuanced than we realize. In a symposium at the 2016 APS Annual Convention, psychological scientists presented new findings about how people parse out blame — and compassion — in various situations.