Latest Issue: Volume 28 Number 8: October 2015

Cover Story

Reaching Citizens Through Science

An Executive Order from President Obama represents a watershed event for psychological science and related disciplines. Under the directive, behavioral researchers will be at the forefront of helping policymakers test strategies aimed at persuading Americans to save for retirement, conserve energy, and much more.

Presidential Column

Bayes for Beginners 2: The Prior

Following on his September column, APS President C. Randy Gallistel shares additional Bayesian basics by discussing the role of prior knowledge in estimates and conclusions.

Mischel, Others Honored at Bipartisan ‘Golden Goose’ Event

APS Past President Walter Mischel and two of his collaborators, APS Fellow Yuichi Shoda and Philip Peake, were honored for famous, federally funded work that began with a certain sugary treat.

Thinking With Gestures

Gestures used in speech are more than random movements used for emphasis — they are integral to human learning and cognition, says APS President-Elect and William James Fellow Susan Goldin-Meadow.

Passing Down Psychopathology

An international panel of psychological scientists, including APS James McKeen Cattell Fellow Michael E. Lamb and APS Fellows Jay Belsky and Marinus H. van IJzendoorn, discuss how genes and environment interact and influence the intergenerational transmission of psychopathology.

1990: An Inaugural Year, a Centennial Year

What accounts for the endless interest in William James’s foundational Principles of Psychology more than a century after its publication? Influential psychological scientists explored this question in one of the earliest issues of APS’s flagship journal.

Rotten Reviews

An editor once described a manuscript by Past APS Board Member Stephen J. Ceci as “developmental juvenilia.” A reviewer once told APS Past President Morton Ann Gernsbacher that publishing her submission would be “dangerous.” These and other leading scientists in psychology share their weirdest and harshest rejections from journal editors and job recruiters, showing that even the field’s leading figures aren’t immune to brutal critiques.

Report Points to Need for Improved Reproducibility

APS Fellow Brian Nosek says a recent high-profile replication project he headed up reflects how psychological researchers are leading efforts to improve the reproducibility of scientific findings.


Remembering Keith Rayner

Colleagues and former students pay homage to a psychological scientist renowned for making the measurement of eye movements a major tool for the study of cognitive processes.

Early-Career ‘Memories’

Newly minted PhD Steven Frenda reflects on the uncertainty that many researchers face immediately following graduate school.

Saving for Later by Saving Now

The Defense Finance and Accounting Service, the White House SBST, and university researchers worked together to design and test an email-based intervention aimed at boosting enrollment in the Thrift Savings Plan among members of the military.

For Farmers, a Little Letter Leads to a Little Money

The US Department of Agriculture is reaching out to farmers who are just starting out, run small farms, or are disadvantaged to encourage them to apply for its new loan program.

Paving the Way to Loan Repayment

The office of Federal Student Aid at the Department of Education coordinated with the SBST to test an email campaign intended to raise awareness of these income-driven repayment options.

Maximizing Email Response Rates

In a collaboration with SBST, federal agencies found that sending an email at just the right time of day could considerably improve response rates.

Signature Honesty

Work by a team of psychological scientists demonstrated a cheap and effective way to cut down on errors and cheating among vendors working for the US federal government.