Latest Issue: Volume 28 Number 3: March 2015


Cover Story

The Digital Lab

In the spirit of the “March Madness” college basketball tournament in the United States, the Observer pays its annual tribute to the latest innovations in psychological science methodology. This year, scientists share their experiences using social media, smartphones, open-source software, and other implements of the Internet age to broaden their data sets and speed up their analyses.


Presidential Column

Magritte’s Mystery and the DSM’s Disorders

In his painting The Treachery of Images, René Magritte warned that illustrations aren’t the same as the real thing. Guest columnist and APS Fellow Jürgen Margraf, of Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, uses the painting as a metaphor for many diagnostic constructs.


Measurement on the Move

Tamlin Conner, University of Otago, discusses her use of mobile-communications data to study emotions and health.


Big Data and the World of Social Media

University of Pennsylvania, shares his experiences working with computer scientists and social-media services to study large populations.


Software to Sharpen Your Stats

A global team of scientists introduce JASP, a free and open software package for statistical analysis.


Strengthening Public Policy With Science

As a behavioral scientist at RAND Corporation, Coreen Farris is seeing her research inform US policy pursuits, including the burgeoning initiative to eliminate sexual assaults in the military.


‘Facts, Fantasies, and the Future of Child Care’ Revisited

In the inaugural issue of APS’s first journal, APS Fellow Deborah Phillips coauthored an article that noted the dearth of research on the effects that child care services have on children’s development. Phillips revisits that 1990 article she wrote with APS Past President Sandra Scarr and APS Fellow Kathleen McCartney and assesses how child care research — and policy — have progressed.


Countering ‘Neuromyths’ in the Movies

Neurological illnesses have fueled the plotlines of hundreds of films, from Rain Man to the Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything. Mary V. Spiers has created a new website to inform the public about the accuracies and myths in cinematic portrayals of brain disorders.