Latest Issue: Volume 28 Number 7: September 2015


Cover Story

Point to Point

From the compass to GPS, humans have relied on devices to guide them to their destinations. But psychological scientists have been exploring new frontiers of discoveries about navigational skills embedded within our own biology.


Presidential Column

Bayes for Beginners: Probability and Likelihood

APS President C. Randy Gallistel has been teaching a Bayesian-oriented graduate course in statistics for years and uses Bayesian methods to analyze his own data. With interest in the statistical approach growing, Gallistel devotes his inaugural presidential column to providing some Bayes basics.


Charging Up the Inner GPS

A team of psychological researchers has demonstrated that a weak sense of direction can be bolstered with a simple electric current to the brain.


Meet the APS Board for 2015–2016

C. Randy Gallistel begins his 1-year term as President of APS’s Board of Directors, while Susan Goldin-Meadow becomes President-Elect. Nancy Eisenberg is Immediate Past President. Dorthe Berntsen and Cindy M. Yee-Bradbury join the Board and will serve through 2018.


‘Significance and Remembrance’ Revisited

APS Past President James L. McGaugh reflects on how our understanding of memory consolidation has evolved in the quarter-century since he wrote the article “Significance and Remembrance: The Role of Neuromodulatory Systems” for the inaugural issue of Psychological Science.


Remembrance

Remembering Janet Taylor Spence

The pioneering research of APS’s first elected president has left contemporary investigators with several key tools for measuring anxiety and attitudes about gender. Janet Taylor Spence’s colleagues remember her transformative work and her
vital role in launching APS.


Janet Taylor Spence: A Life in Science

A timeline lists highlights in the life of Janet Taylor Spence.


Walter Mischel and Collaborators Receive 2015 Golden Goose Award

APS Past President Walter Mischel, APS Fellow Yuichi Shoda, and Philip Peake have been recognized for their ground-breaking research on the nature of self-control.


The Media as Research Collaborators

News reporting not only helps to bring psychological science to the public, but it also can facilitate the research, as APS Fellow Melanie Killen learned when she teamed up with CNN for a study examining children’s racial bias.


Data ‘Salvation’ for Suicide Research

APS James McKeen Cattell Fellow Marsha M. Linehan, renowned for her development of evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder and suicidality, warns that the standard interventions for suicidal behavior — including hospitalization — are largely unsupported by science.


How Poverty Affects the Brain and Behavior

Living in poverty can impede an individual’s cognitive development, executive functioning, and attention. At the inaugural International Convention of Psychological Science, a panel of scientists including APS William James Fellow Martha J. Farah and APS Fellow Eldar Shafir discussed the long-term cognitive and behavioral outcomes of growing up poor.


A Milestone in Federally Funded Behavioral Science

A special symposium celebrated the 20th anniversary of the US National Institutes of Health’s Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.


Being Choosy About Choosing

Choices are expressions of personality and acts of individuation, but they also are acts of communication. In a talk sponsored by the Society for the Teaching of Psychology, Sheena Iyengar described a variety of studies demonstrating how our choices do not always reflect our stated preferences.


Leveraging Psychological Science

At a symposium at the 2015 APS Annual Convention, clinicians and researchers explored how insights gleaned from psychological science can inform health care strategies and procedures to ultimately improve patient outcomes.


Defining Dysfunction: Clinical Psychology’s New Frontier

Speakers at a symposium at the 2015 APS Annual Convention discussed the benefits and challenges of a new framework developed to study psychopathology by examining cognitive and biological features rather than relying solely on observable symptoms.


The ADHD Explosion

During his Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology Distinguished Scientist Award Address at the 2015 APS Annual Convention, APS Fellow Stephen P. Hinshaw of the University of California, Berkeley examined the multitude of factors that lead to the development, pathology, and stigma surrounding ADHD.