Convention

Observer Article

Portrait of Self-Control as a Young Process

Stereotypes portray the teen brain as an out-of-control car with “no brakes, no steering wheel, and only an accelerator,” says APS Fellow BJ Casey. Research shows that teenagers take risks because reward centers develop more quickly than control centers in their brains. But changes in the adolescent brain ultimately help prepare teens to become independent of their parents. APS Fellow Ruth Feldman, Clancy Blair, and Angela L. Duckworth also speak about self-regulation across the lifespan in APS President Nancy Eisenberg’s 2015 Presidential Symposium. ... More>


Observer Article

The Social Powers of Primates

Frans B.M. de Waal has news for people who think that the tendency to establish cultural norms separates humans from other animals: By teaching a high-ranking female chimpanzee how to solve a complicated puzzle and then watching copycat behavior spread among her group, de Waal and his colleagues documented evidence of both complex social learning and conformity in nonhumans. ... More>


Observer Article

The Curse of Knowledge: Pinker Describes a Key Cause of Bad Writing

APS Fellow Steven A. Pinker says writers often assume readers understand the obscure words they use and know the esoteric facts they reference — and these assumptions fuel poor prose. ... More>


Observer Article

Why Should Psychological Science Care About Diversity?

A 2010 analysis of articles published in leading psychology journals showed that 95% of all samples came from Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic societies. APS Fellow Robert M. Sellers wants his field to study a broader cross-section of humanity — with investigators from underrepresented groups at the helm. ... More>


Observer Article

First-Rate Science on Symposium Sunday

APS always saves some of the best for last — does that mean we’d pass the marshmallow test? Every year, the Annual Convention’s can’t-miss Symposium Sunday offers cutting-edge findings on urgent public and scientific topics. In New York, these include research on attitudes about climate change and nontraditional methods for delivering cognitive-behavioral therapy. ... More>