Paying Attention Doesn’t Mean You’ll Remember What You Saw

We can forget information just seconds after having used it to make a judgment if we expect to use it in the future, psychology researchers at Penn State find. More>

      

Transgender Kids Show Consistent Gender Identity Across Measures

A study with 32 transgender children, ages 5 to 12, indicates that their gender identity is deeply held and not the result of confusion or pretense.

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Researchers Investigate Why Cyclists Run Red Lights

Analysis of video from urban intersections reveals several psychological factors that lead bicyclists to ride through red traffic signals.

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Playing With Puzzles and Blocks Could Build Children’s Spatial Skills

Play may seem like fun and games, but new research shows that specific kinds of play are actually associated with development of particular cognitive skills.

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Seeing Themselves as Overweight May Be Self-Fulfilling Prophecy for Some Teens

Data from over 6500 adolescents show that teens who mistakenly perceive themselves as overweight are actually at greater risk of obesity as adults.

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How Hierarchy Can Help Teams Scale New Heights

A new study analyzing data from Himalayan mountain climbers finds that hierarchy within high-stakes teams can both improve and undermine performance.

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Mothers’ “Baby Talk” Is Less Clear Than Their Adult Speech

While we might think that “baby talk” is easier for children to understand, new research suggests that mothers actually speak less clearly to their infants than they do to adults.

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