Walter Mischel Columns

On the Future of APS Journals

In these Presidential Columns, from September 2008 to January 2009, I discussed the implicit understandings and misunderstandings — the urban legends of our field — about our roles in the publication process as researchers, contributors, reviewers, and editors. I looked at how these legends may influence what we do, sometimes More

Becoming a Cumulative Science

In this space, I have been discussing urban legends in psychological science about our multiple roles within academic life. Assuming you are reading (and remembering) these Observer columns the way I did when I didn’t have to write them, I’ll briefly recapitulate some earlier points as they bear on today’s More

The Toothbrush Problem

In these columns, I have been discussing our “urban legends” — the often unspoken but widely shared understandings and misunderstandings about how to build a research-focused academic life in psychology. My goal is to look at how these legends, rooted in the past, may influence our various roles as journal More

Our Urban Legends: Grants

My first column on our “urban legends” discussed implicit understandings and misunderstandings about what it takes to get published in different kinds of psychology journals. My second column turned to legends about the policies and behavior of journal reviewers and editors, including a wish list of what they should not More

Our Urban Legends: Journal Reviews

In my last column, I discussed urban legends about journal publishing, noting that these have subtle and not so subtle influences on how research is done and presented that can inadvertently undermine the development of an increasingly cumulative and robust psychological science. I picked particularly on the legend that to More