Television

The effect of media violence on behavior is not only an interesting psychological question but is also a relevant public policy and public health issue. Although many studies have been conducted examining the link between violence on TV and aggressive behavior, most of these studies have overlooked several other potentially More

Children’s educational television has had a successful beginning and middle, but as it extends its lessons through the Internet and classroom activities, will it help kids live happily ever after? In the early 1970s, graduate student Barbara Flagg, who studied children’s attention patterns and beginning reading, made the realization that More

How ‘Unequivocal’ is the Evidence Regarding Television Violence and Children’s Aggression? In their review of the influence of media violence on youth, “The Influence of Media Violence on Youth,” published in Volume 4 of Psychological Science in the Public Interest, Anderson et al. concluded that there is “unequivocal evidence” that More

When Harry Met Hallie Would a rose, by any other name, smell as sweet? It may depend whether your name is Roberta or Louise. Twenty years ago, Belgian psychologist J. M. Nuttin discovered that people especially like the letters that appear in their own names but are generally unaware of More

It grew gradually throughout the year and reached a thundering crescendo that could no longer be ignored: A column on Dr. Phil.   When I started thinking about writing these monthly Observer columns, I asked friends and colleagues for suggestions and ideas. I was pretty surprised at how often the More

See Also: Reality Check That was the question posed to APS Board Member Barbara A. Spellman, University of Virginia, who founded the APS Committee on Human Subject Protection. Spellman breaks down which reality shows would pass, which would not, and which would not even be considered. The first question is More