Biopsychology

Stepping Into the Mix

I was introduced to interdisciplinary research during my very first lab meeting in graduate school in 1991. Judith Rodin, my first advisor, was leading a MacArthur Foundation network on Health-Promoting and Health-Damaging Behaviors, including the role of stress. The network included diverse and broad thinkers such as neuroscientist Bruce McEwen More

‘Tis the Season

For APS Fellow Irving Zucker, there really is a reason for the seasons — or at least the seasonal rhythms of mammals — and it’s melatonin. Zucker studies biological and behavioral rhythms generated by an internal timer set by environmental changes in day length. “The first reason [to study seasonal More

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fMRI Special Section of Perspectives on Psychological Science

Neuroimaging—is it voodoo, new phrenology, or scientific breakthrough? See what the experts have to say in this special section on fMRI in Perspectives on Psychological Science Neuroimaging: Voodoo, New Phrenology, or Scientific Breakthrough? Introduction to Special Section on fMRI  Ed Diener  In response to the widespread interest following the publication More

Study Finds We Are Better Able to Detect Racial Tension in Members of Our Racial Group

In March of 2008, in a speech addressing contemporary racial tensions in America, then-Senator Barack Obama suggested that there is a “chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races.” Could this be true? Is it more difficult for members of different races to understand each others’ emotions and intentions? Psychologist More

What Does it Mean to be Alive? How Notions of the Natural World Unfold- in Development and Across Languages.

Understanding the concept of a “living thing” is a late developmental achievement. Early research by Jean Piaget, showed that kids attribute “life status” to things that move on their own (e.g. clouds or bikes) and even 10-year-olds have difficulty understanding the scope of a living thing. New research, supported by More

Got Sugar? Glucose Affects Our Ability to Resist Temptation

New research from a lab at Florida State University reveals that self-control takes fuel — literally. When we exercise it, resisting temptations to misbehave, our fuel tank is depleted, making subsequent efforts at self-control more difficult. Florida State psychologist Roy F. Baumeister and his colleagues Kathleen D. Vohs, University of More