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Politics, Civility, and Ideology – Insights from Psychological Science

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We are political animals and it all starts in our brains. Psychological science gives us unique insights into an election year’s intensity and questions of political incivility, political ideology, political attitudes and brain structure, our genes and our political orientation, and emotional influences on decision making will be explored by leaders in the field at the Association for Psychological Science annual convention. These and many more panels, lectures, workshops and symposia will be featured throughout the convention in Chicago, held May 24-27, 2012.

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Incivility and partisan gridlock are not unique to our time, but they have gotten worse since the early 1990s. In this talk, Jonathan Haidt, author of The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion will show how recent findings in moral psychology, combined with a dash of political science, can help us understand what has happened in the United States that renders the national government increasingly unable to act in an efficient and effective way.

Jonathan Haidt, Professor of Social Psychology, University of Virginia — Haidt@virginia.Edu

Saturday May 26, 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM

Michigan

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Five experts in neuroscience and psychological science will meet to discuss new findings about the way our brains and minds deal with political ideology.  John Jost from New York University will discuss his own research on the genetic origins, manifestations and social consequences of ideology.  He will also moderate the session.

John T Jost, Professor of Psychology, New York University.  John.jost@nyu.edu

Saturday, May 26, 2012 1:30PM-2:50

Michigan

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News media may register to attend the conference for free at http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/convention/aps-23rd-annual-convention-2011-press-information.