2021 APS Board of Directors Election

Cast your vote and influence APS’s future! To be eligible to vote you must be a full APS Member as of April 26, 2021.

The APS Election is administered by a third party. Watch for your secure voter code in a separate email from psychologicalscience-voting@balloteer.com on April 27.

Questions about voting? Contact aps@psychologicalscience.org.

Candidates for APS President-Elect

The APS President-Elect will serve a 3-year term (as President-Elect, President, Past President), beginning in June 2021.

Alison Gopnik

University of California, Berkeley


Alison Gopnik

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology, affiliate professor of philosophy, and member of The Berkeley AI Research group at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her BA from McGill University and her PhD from Oxford University.

She is a leader in cognitive science and the study of children’s learning and development, and she was one of the founders of the field of “theory of mind,” an originator of the “theory theory” of children’s development, and the person who introduced the idea that probabilistic models and Bayesian inference could be applied to children’s learning.

She is an elected member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences and an APS, Cognitive Science Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Guggenheim Fellow. She has been continuously supported by the NSF.

She is the author of over 120 journal articles and several books including the bestselling and critically acclaimed popular books The Scientist in the Crib, The Philosophical Baby, and The Gardener and the Carpenter. She has written widely about cognitive science and psychology for The New York Times, The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Scientific American, The New York Review of Books, New Scientist and Slate, among others.

Her TED Talk on her work has been viewed more than 4.7 million times. She has frequently appeared on TV and radio including The Charlie Rose Show, The Colbert Report, Radio Lab, and The Ezra Klein Show. Since 2013 she has written the “Mind and Matter” column for the Wall Street Journal.

She has also consulted with governments and NGOs about the importance of child development and caregiving—an issue whose political moment has finally arrived and where APS could play a major role—and has been a strong advocate for better and broader science communication, another APS focus.

Gün R. Semin

ISPA, Lisbon


Gün R. Semin

I have been centrally involved in APS’s efforts to strengthen psychological science as an integrative global field and would be honored to serve as its first international president. 

The guiding vision of integrative science has shaped my research and collaborations with colleagues across Europe and the US. My work on language and social cognition resulted in a linguistic model of interpersonal language with wide-ranging applications. Currently I work on social cognition, communication via chemosignals, and interspecies communication.

My PhD is from the University of London. I have held academic positions at Sussex University; Free University Amsterdam (Chair of Social Psychology); Inter-university Graduate School in Social Psychology-Kurt Lewin Institute (Scientific Director); and Academy Professor (Utrecht University). Currently I am the Director of the William James Center for Research, ISPA, Lisbon.

I have received grants and honors including the Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship (Mannheim University, Germany); Distinguished Research Professorship (Koç University, Istanbul); and the distinctive PIONIER grant from the Dutch Science Foundation (NWO). In 2004, the Netherlands Royal Academy of Arts and Sciences awarded me the prestigious Academy Professorship. In 2012, the Queen of the Netherlands conferred on me the order of “Officier-in-de-Orde van Oranje-Nassau” for scientific contributions. I have received the theoretical Innovation Prize from SPSP and the Tom Ostrom Award for lifelong contributions to social cognition. I am a fellow of numerous organizations, including APS, the Psychonomic Society, SESP, and SPSP.

My service to the field: President of the European Association of Social Psychology; Chair – European Social Cognition Network; Chair – Social Sciences Committee, European Science Foundation; Chair of several European Committees; and member of the ERC Advanced Grant panels. My service to APS: Secretary of the Board of Directors; Chair of the APS Internationalization Committee; and founding Co-Chair (with Walter Mischel) of the International Convention of Psychological Science.

Candidates for Member-at-Large (Slate 1)

Members-at-Large will serve a 3-year term on the APS Board of Directors, beginning in June 2021.

Yoshihisa Kashima

Yoshihisa Kashima

University of Melbourne, Australia

Yoshihisa Kashima is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Born in Tokyo, Japan, where he completed his undergraduate education in law, he began his career in psychology in the United States and is now based in Australia. Employing diverse methods ranging from experimentation and surveys to formal modelling and computer simulations, he conducts basic research on the psychology of cultural dynamics—psychological foundations of the formation, maintenance, and transformation of culture over time. He then translates these basic principles to cultural and behavior-change research in health and sustainability. His editorial experiences include serving as Editor of Asian Journal of Social Psychology, and as Associate Editor of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology and Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology. Much of Kashima’s career has been devoted to the internationalization and globalization of psychological science. He is a founder of the Asian Association of Social Psychology and served as the President of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology. A Fellow of APS, the Society for Experimental Psychology, and the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, he was elected a Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia in 2016 and is currently serving as a Co-Chair of the International Convention of Psychological Science for APS. From climate change and pandemics to growing inequality and geopolitical transformations of the world, humanity faces major challenges arising in both natural and human-made environments. Believing that psychology can contribute to humanity’s efforts to meet the challenges only if its perspective and scope are global, he will, as a Board Member, help further internationalize APS and its global capacity to support the human endeavor.

Silvia Koller

Silvia Koller

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Brazil

Silvia Koller is a Brazilian Developmental Psychologist, Full Professor and Chair of the Center for Psychological Studies of At-Risk Populations at the Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Brazil. Recently, she was a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Graduate School of Education and a Visiting Scientist at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is also an Extraordinary Professor at North West University in South Africa and Honorary Professor at the Universidad de Chiclayo and Universidad Autónoma del Peru. She has strong interest in and commitment to the internationalization of knowledge in developmental psychology, which has led her to disseminate research in several scientific associations around the world, as well as publish her research in quality journals. She has been an APS Fellow since 2015 and has served APS in different roles, as a member of the Program Committee that organized the International Convention of Psychological Science in Vienna, Austria in 2017 and as a member of the APS Rising Stars Committee. She also has experience in various international associations (SRCD, SRA, ISSBD, IAAP, and others). She has served as member of the Executive Board of ISSBD and has chaired diverse International Committees of multiple associations. She has lectured at various universities in Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Germany, Peru, Rwanda, South Africa, Switzerland, Zambia, USA, and elsewhere. During her years as a PhD and master’s advisor, she mentored a growing cadre of faculty members, who are now rising stars within African, Brazilian, Colombian, Portuguese, German, and US psychology. She set the highest standards for her students and provided them with the supportive environment they needed to meet or exceed her and their own expectations.

Eric-Jan Wagenmakers

Eric-Jan (EJ) Wagenmakers

University of Amsterdam

Eric-Jan (EJ) Wagenmakers is Professor of Psychological Methods at the University of Amsterdam. Wagenmakers is a Fellow of the APS and a past member of the APS Annual Convention Program committee (2014-2016). He has served as an action-editor for the Journal of Mathematical Psychology, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Cognitive Psychology, and PLoS Biology. He is a past president of the Society for Mathematical Psychology, whose annual meeting he helped organize in 2009. Wagenmakers’s current research interests center on cognitive modeling, Bayesian inference, and philosophy of science. He is also the founder and director of JASP (jasp-stats.org), a free and open-source software program for statistical analyses. Wagenmakers would like APS to solidify and expand its role in improving the quality and dependability of psychological science. This may require more training (e.g., online workshop series), more quantitative modeling (e.g., through increased interaction with adjacent fields), and more transparency (e.g., through many-analysts approaches). At the Annual Convention, EJ would like APS to explore ways in which to highlight the contributions of early career researchers. 

Candidates for Member-at-Large (Slate 2)

Members-at-Large will serve a 3-year term on the APS Board of Directors, beginning in June 2021.

Damien Fair

Damien Fair

University of Minnesota

Damien Fair is a Cognitive Neuroscientist and Professor in the Institute of Child Development and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. He is also the Redleaf Endowed Director of the Masonic Institute of the Developing Brain. Combining technical advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging, advanced mathematics, and expertise in psychology and neuroscience, Fair has been able to demonstrate several basic principles of brain development and its relationships to typical and atypical behaviors. In 2012, he was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers Issued by President Barack Obama and the White House. In 2020, he was named a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fellow. He currently serves on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and Council for the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He also serves on the Scientific Research Council for the Child Mind Institute. Fair is deeply committed to public service, community engagement, and STEM education. He founded and directed the Youth Engaged in Science (YES!) initiative (2011–2020), a program aimed at exposing underrepresented youth to scientific research and related careers. He founded and directed the OHSU Fellowship for Diversity and Inclusion (2014–2020), a program aimed at increasing diversity of the scientific workforce in academia. He has served on the Society for Neuroscience Public Education and Communication Committee, Press Committee, Workforce and Training Groups, and maintained a position on the BrainFacts.org editorial board (2017–2020). He has given several briefings to the Congressional Neuroscience Caucus and the American Brain Coalition on the intersection of brain development and policy making. Fair would like to align his efforts with APS to advance the intersection of cognitive psychology and neuroscience and widen the reach of those who are trained and “touched” by the efforts.

Joseph P. Gone

Joseph P. Gone

Harvard University

Joseph P. Gone has collaborated for over 25 years with American Indian and other Indigenous communities to rethink mental health services for advancing indigenous well-being. An enrolled member of the Aaniiih-Gros Ventre tribal nation of Montana, Gone has attended to the distinctive cultural psychologies of Native American communities to identify local concepts of wellness and distress, to uncover the logics of Indigenous therapeutic traditions, and to reframe clinical care with respect to Indigenous traditional knowledges. Throughout this work, he has endeavored to reconcile evidence-based practice and cultural competence in mental health services. His publications have appeared in the Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, the American Psychologist, and the American Journal of Community Psychology. Gone began his career with a brief stint on the faculty in Human Development at the University of Chicago prior to serving for 16 years on the faculty in clinical psychology and Native American Studies at the University of Michigan. He recently joined the Faculties of Arts and Sciences and of Medicine at Harvard University. Gone has served on the editorial boards of seven psychology journals (including Clinical Psychological Science), and reviewed manuscripts for nearly 100 additional journals in the behavioral and health sciences. A Fellow of APS, Gone is the recipient of several fellowships and career awards. In 2010, he was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. In 2014, he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. This summer, APA will honor him with the 2021 Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research. Currently, he serves as the Faculty Director of the Harvard University Native American Program, and as incoming President of the Society of Indian Psychologists. Gone aspires to promote psychological science and APS commitments through greater outreach and exchange with more diverse constituencies.

Tania Lombrozo

Tania Lombrozo

Princeton University

Tania Lombrozo is Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Psychology at Princeton University, where she directs the Concepts and Cognition Lab. She is also a faculty associate of Princeton’s Department of Philosophy and University Center for Human Values. Lombrozo’s research aims to address foundational questions about cognition using the empirical tools of cognitive psychology and the conceptual tools of analytic philosophy. Her work focuses on explanation and understanding, conceptual representation, categorization, social cognition, causal reasoning, and folk epistemology. She is the recipient of numerous early-career awards, including the Stanton Prize from the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, the APS Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions, an Early Investigator Award from the Society of Experimental Psychologists, a Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career contributions from the American Psychological Association, the Joseph B. Gittler Award from the American Psychological Foundation, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, and a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar Award in Understanding Human Cognition. In addition to writing for an academic audience, she regularly writes for a general audience. From 2012 to 2018, she was a (bi)weekly blogger for NPR, covering topics in psychology, philosophy, and cognitive science. Lombrozo hopes to support APS’s mission to engage with the public in supporting a better and deeper understanding of science, including its role in decision making at individual and societal levels. She is also committed to improving research practices and reducing barriers to diverse participation in the field.