Batter Up! It's the Season of Stats

The Major League Baseball postseason is underway, bringing heightened attention to batting averages, runs batted in, and on-base percentages. Statistics are not only essential to MLB fans, but to daily life. Science shows how we use statistical thinking in sports, finances, learning, and social interactions.

  • A sunny day or the fact that your favorite sports team unexpectedly won yesterday won’t improve your chances of winning the lottery and yet they might increase the likelihood that you’ll buy a ticket. More

    Why Sports Wins and Sunshine May Lead You to Gamble

    A sunny day or the fact that your favorite sports team unexpectedly won yesterday won’t improve your chances of winning the lottery and yet they might increase the likelihood that you’ll buy a ticket. More

  • People make statistically-informed judgments about who is more likely to hold particular professions even though they criticize others for the same behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “People don’t like it when someone uses group averages to make judgments about More

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    Our Social Judgments Reveal a Tension Between Morals and Statistics

    People make statistically-informed judgments about who is more likely to hold particular professions even though they criticize others for the same behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “People don’t like it when someone uses group averages to make judgments about More

  • Researchers find that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance. More

    Becoming an Expert Takes More Than Practice

    Researchers find that the amount of practice accumulated over time does not seem to play a huge role in accounting for individual differences in skill or performance. More

  • It might seem as though some players are on a streak, with their chances of success getting better with every shot they take. But the data suggest otherwise. More

    Scoring the winning points at a basketball game , motion blur

    The Cold Truth About “Heating Up” on the Court

    It might seem as though some players are on a streak, with their chances of success getting better with every shot they take. But the data suggest otherwise. More

  • Duke University psychological scientist Gregory Samanez-Larkin has developed an accessible way to teach statistical analysis — having students examine data about their own health. More

    Making Statistics Personal

    Duke University psychological scientist Gregory Samanez-Larkin has developed an accessible way to teach statistical analysis — having students examine data about their own health. More

  • When we evaluate and compare a range of data points, we tend to neglect the relative strength of the evidence and treat it as simply binary. More

    Black and white curved arrows showing directions on turquoise blue background.

    Binary Bias Distorts How We Integrate Information

    When we evaluate and compare a range of data points, we tend to neglect the relative strength of the evidence and treat it as simply binary. More

  • A pair of psychological scientists review the state of research on statistics anxiety and outline several ways for instructors to help reduce students' worries. More

    Science Shows How Students Can Stop Sweating Statistics

    A pair of psychological scientists review the state of research on statistics anxiety and outline several ways for instructors to help reduce students' worries. More

  • How much variation is there when different researchers analyze the same data? Quite a bit, according to a study published in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science. More

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    How Researchers Can Find Different Results Using the Same Data

    How much variation is there when different researchers analyze the same data? Quite a bit, according to a study published in Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science. More

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