False Memory

Sleep Deprivation May Increase Susceptibility to False Memories

Not getting enough sleep may increase the likelihood of forming false memories, according to research published in Psychological Science, a More

  • Lab-based research shows that adults can be convinced, over the course of a few hours, that as teens they perpetrated crimes that never actually occurred. More

    People Can Be Convinced They Committed a Crime That Never Happened

    Lab-based research shows that adults can be convinced, over the course of a few hours, that as teens they perpetrated crimes that never actually occurred. More

  • In the same way a flash camera captures a moment in time, decisive events create vivid, long-lasting, and poignant memories. And many of those memories are wrong. More

    Memory Science and the Kennedy Assassination

    In the same way a flash camera captures a moment in time, decisive events create vivid, long-lasting, and poignant memories. And many of those memories are wrong. More

  • The consumption of as little as 100 mg of caffeine elicits reliable changes in arousal and, in turn, false memories in individuals who do not habitually consume caffeine, according to a study. More

    Study: False Memory Increases in Nonhabitual Consumers of Caffeine

    The consumption of as little as 100 mg of caffeine elicits reliable changes in arousal and, in turn, false memories in individuals who do not habitually consume caffeine, according to a study. More

  • A research report explains how eyewitnesses’ memories can become distorted after speaking with co-witnesses. More

    When Eyewitnesses Talk, Justice Is Distorted

    A research report explains how eyewitnesses’ memories can become distorted after speaking with co-witnesses. More

  • Psychological scientists have discovered all sorts of ways that false memories get created, and now there's another one for the list: watching someone else do an action can make you think you did it yourself. More

    False Memories of Self-Performance Result From Watching Others’ Actions

    Psychological scientists have discovered all sorts of ways that false memories get created, and now there's another one for the list: watching someone else do an action can make you think you did it yourself. More

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