Developmental Psychology

Infants Able to Distinguish Positive/Negative Parenting, Study Shows

Nearly half a century ago, psychiatrist John Bowlby proposed that the instincts underpinning infants’ attachment to their mother are accompanied by “internal working models,” which help them to better understand the world around them. These mental models  mediate infants’ ability to use their caregiver as a buffer against the stresses More

New Research Shows Children Less Prone to False Memories than Adults, Challenging Assumptions About Eyewitness Testimony.

In the 1980’s, a spate of high profile child abuse convictions gave way to heightened concern about false memory reports given by children. Take, for example, the case of Kelly Michaels, a preschool teacher who was convicted on 115 counts of sexual abuse based on the testimony of 20 of More

Your Mom was Wrong: Horseplay is an Important Part of Development

Playground roughhousing has long been a tradition of children and adolescents, much to the chagrin of several generations of parents who worry that their child will be hurt or worse, become accustom to violence and aggression.  But animal research may paint a different portrait of rough and tumble play; one More

Not the Same Old Post-Doc

Big Psychology Grants Big Psychology Grants is an occasional series featuring large-scale studies and other notable programs in psychological science. This month, we look at a new training program in developmental research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Writing a grant proposal is a little like designing your own house, says More