APS James S. Jackson Lifetime Achievement Award for Transformative Scholarship

James S. Jackson, a pioneering social psychologist known for his research on race and ethnicity, racism, and health and aging among African Americans, died on September 1, 2020, following a nearly 50-year career at the University of Michigan. In tribute to Jackson’s transformative, diversity-focused scholarship, the APS James S. Jackson Lifetime Achievement Award for Transformative Scholarship honors APS Members for their lifetime of outstanding psychological research that advances understanding of historically disadvantaged racial and ethnic groups and/or understanding of the psychological and societal benefits of racial/ethnic diversity, equity, and inclusion.

The type of scholarship honored by the award is broad in scope and research methodology, and encompasses research on historically disadvantaged racial/ethnic groups residing anywhere in the world. Recipients’ research contributions may be in any field or area of psychological science.

APS’s lifetime achievement awards are not exclusive. In other words, an exceptional psychological scientist might be awarded all of them.


Submit a APS James S. Jackson Lifetime Achievement Award for Transformative Scholarship Nomination


James S. Jackson Lifetime Achievement Award for Transformative Scholarship Committee

Jennifer L. Eberhardt
Stanford University

Michele Gelfand
Stanford University

Shinobu Kitayama
University of Michigan

Ann Kring
University of California, Berkeley

Vonnie C. McLoyd
University of Michigan

2022 Award Recipients

Patricia Gurin

University of Michigan

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A lifelong champion of social justice and diversity efforts, Patricia Gurin is renowned for her exceptional work in social psychology domains including women’s studies, social identity, intergroup relations, motivation and cognition, and diversity.


James M. Jones

University of Delaware

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James M. Jones’s pioneering research in prejudice, racism, and diversity has driven social change and awareness by proposing thought-provoking techniques for improving intergroup relations, examining bias from a neuroscientific point of view, and identifying the factors that shape how people respond to diversity.