Latest Research News

Your Mom was Wrong: Horseplay is an Important Part of Development

Playground roughhousing has long been a tradition of children and adolescents, much to the chagrin of several generations of parents who worry that their child will be hurt or worse, become accustom to violence and aggression.  But animal research may paint a different portrait of rough and tumble play; one More

Man’s Best Friend Lends Insight into Human Evolution

Flexibly drawing inferences about the intentions of other individuals in order to cooperate in complex tasks is a basic part of everyday life that we humans take for granted. But, according to evolutionary psychologist Brian Hare at the Max Planck Institute in Germany, this ability is present in other species More

How do I Love Me? New Study Presents a Twist on the Conventional Narcissist.

A brush with a narcissist’s inflated ego often leaves one reeling with resentment. Whether it is their constant need for attention or their unfounded sense of entitlement, we are often quick to attribute their shallow behavior to an unconscious self-loathing. However, new research from Keith Campbell at the University of More

When God Sanctions Killing, the People Listen

New research published in the March issue of Psychological Science may help elucidate the relationship between religious indoctrination and violence, a topic that has gained renewed notoriety in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks.  In the article, University of Michigan psychologist Brad Bushman and his colleagues suggest that More

NYU Study Shows Diminished Sense of Moral Outrage Key to Maintaining View that World is Fair and Just

People who see the world as essentially fair can just maintain this perception through a diminished sense of moral outrage, according to a study by researchers in New York University’s Department of Psychology. The findings appear in the March issue of the journal Psychological Science, which is published by the More