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Attention to Angry Faces May Predict Future Depression

A prospective study using eye-tracking technology shows that an attentional bias toward angry faces predicts future depressive episodes among women with a history of depression. ... More>


Portrait of Self-Control as a Young Process

Stereotypes portray the teen brain as an out-of-control car with “no brakes, no steering wheel, and only an accelerator,” says APS Fellow BJ Casey. Research shows that teenagers take risks because reward centers develop more quickly than control centers in their brains. But changes in the adolescent brain ultimately help prepare teens to become independent of their parents. APS Fellow Ruth Feldman, Clancy Blair, and Angela L. Duckworth also speak about self-regulation across the lifespan in APS President Nancy Eisenberg’s 2015 Presidential Symposium. ... More>


Why the modern world is bad for your brain


Smartphones Don’t Make Us Dumb


Making Tasks More Difficult May Help Overrule Office Distractions

Increasing the difficulty of a task may help focus attention and shield against noisy office distractions, especially for people who are more easily distracted. ... More>