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Observer Article

The Media as Research Collaborators

News reporting not only helps to bring psychological science to the public, but it also can facilitate the research, as APS Fellow Melanie Killen learned when she teamed up with CNN for a study examining children’s racial bias. ... More>

What’s “Fair” Depends on Where You Come From

The idea that “you get what you earn” may be common in Western societies, but research with children from three different cultures shows that the idea isn't universal. ... More>

Why Children Need Playhouses

Observer Article

Portrait of Self-Control as a Young Process

Stereotypes portray the teen brain as an out-of-control car with “no brakes, no steering wheel, and only an accelerator,” says APS Fellow BJ Casey. Research shows that teenagers take risks because reward centers develop more quickly than control centers in their brains. But changes in the adolescent brain ultimately help prepare teens to become independent of their parents. APS Fellow Ruth Feldman, Clancy Blair, and Angela L. Duckworth also speak about self-regulation across the lifespan in APS President Nancy Eisenberg’s 2015 Presidential Symposium. ... More>

At What Age Does Hard Work Add a Shine to Lousy Prizes?

Putting in a lot of effort to earn a reward makes unappealing prizes more attractive to kindergarteners, but not to preschoolers, new findings show. ... More>