Skills-Building Workshops

Workshops are extended educational sessions that offer attendees the opportunity to learn research methods and techniques from prominent psychological scientists.

Workshops are open to Convention and/or Teaching Institute registrants only and require separate registration.

Thursday, May 24

An Introduction to Implementing Bayesian Methods for Estimating Latent Variable Models

9:00AM-11:50AM Thursday, May 24

Sarah Depaoli, University of California, Merced

This workshop will provide current users of latent variable models an introduction to implementing the Bayesian estimation framework. Basic elements of the Bayesian framework will be described. In addition, the speaker will explore potential problems (and corresponding solutions) that can arise when using Bayesian methods for latent variable models.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Statistical Power Analysis: From Basic to Mixed/Longitudinal Designs

9:00AM-12:50PM, Thursday, May 24

Jean-Philippe Laurenceau, University of Delaware
Niall P. Bolger, Columbia University

We will provide a practical guide to power analysis as part of a “full cycle” approach to empirical inquiry. Topics include: an introduction to power analysis, a brief tutorial on Mplus and its use for simulation-based power analysis with cross-sectional and multilevel examples, and an examination of the trade-off of number of subjects vs. number of time points in longitudinal designs.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

MouseTracker Design and Analysis for Studying Real-Time Cognitive Dynamics

9:00AM-12:50PM, Thursday, May 24

Jonathan B. Freeman, New York University

Using MouseTracker software (http://www.mousetracker.org), this workshop will provide training on designing and running mouse-tracking experiments. There will also be training on both basic and advanced uses of mouse-tracking data, including deviation/curvature/attraction analyses, millisecond-resolution time-course analyses, and fMRI synchronization, among others. Conceptual issues will also be discussed, including comparisons with reaction times and other methodologies (e.g., eye-tracking, EEG).

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Mediation With Repeated-Measures and Multilevel Data

9:00AM-12:50PM, Thursday, May 24

Amanda K. Montoya, The Ohio State University
Nicholas J. Rockwood, The Ohio State University

This workshop overviews mediation analysis in repeated-measures designs, when the independent variable of interest is a within-participant factor, and multilevel designs. We will cover implementation (using two freely available tools for SPSS and SAS) and interpretation for questions of mediation in these designs. Participants are strongly encouraged to bring laptops.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Doing Reproducible Research: Integrating Open Science Into Daily Practice

10:00AM-11:50AM Thursday, May 24

Katherine S. Corker, Grand Valley State University

Day-to-day work in science is habitual, and introducing open science into one’s workflow requires a change of habits. This workshop introduces practices that make research more reproducible. The speaker discusses planning and practicalities of preregistration, open materials, open data and code, and preprints. The workshop includes an introduction to Open Science Framework and PsyArXiv.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Introduction to Python

12:00PM-3:50PM Thursday, May 24

Christian C. Luhmann, Stony Brook University, The State University of New York

Python is a free, general-purpose programming language with an expansive ecosystem of tools providing behavioral scientists with an end-to-end data-collection/data-processing pipeline. We will assume no prior knowledge of Python and will present a series of illustrative examples following a single data set through the pipeline.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Introduction to R Statistical System

12:00PM-3:50PM Thursday, May 24

William Revelle, Northwestern University
David Condon, Northwestern University
Sara J. Weston, Northwestern University

 R is an integrated suite of software facilities for data manipulation, calculation, and graphical display that is particularly useful for psychological scientists. This workshop will assume no prior knowledge of R and will emphasize standard functions for analysis and display of experimental and correlational data for the classroom and research.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Scientific Writing for Psychological Scientists

1:00PM-3:50PM Thursday, May 24

Robert V. Kail, Purdue University

This workshop will consist of lessons designed to help participants learn to write clearly, concisely, and gracefully. The workshop will be highly interactive: Each lesson is organized around a single theme in which heuristics for effective writing are presented, and participants practice those heuristics in an anonymous chat room.

Meta-Analysis Small and Large

1:30PM-5:20PM Thursday, May 24

Blakeley B. McShane, Northwestern University

The presenter will show how to conduct meta-analyses on both the small scale (few studies from one or few papers; one dependent variable) and the large (many studies from many papers; multiple dependent variables) using recent advances and easy-to-use websites. Ample time will be provided for Q&A and “bring your own data” discussion/analyses.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Friday, May 25

Teaching the New Statistics

9:00AM-10:50AM Friday, May 25

Tamarah Smith, Cabrini University
Robert J. Calin-Jageman, Dominican University

Teaching the new statistics requires a shift from the traditional curriculum taught in psychology statistics courses. Through hands-on activities, this workshop will prepare instructors to teach the new statistics. Modules for three common designs taught in introductory statistics courses and supporting teaching materials will be provided. Please bring your own laptop.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Sunday, May 27

An Introduction to Social Network Analysis

9:00AM-11:20AM Sunday, May 27

Gregory D. Webster, University of Florida

Social network analysis is becoming the vanguard of methodological approaches to understanding individuals in social contexts. Because social networks integrate information about individuals (nodes) and their relationships (ties), they are ideal for understanding human social interaction. This workshop will provide a primer on social network analysis for psychological scientists.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Programming for Psychologists:  An Introduction With Tips and Tricks for Making Your Life (and Your Science) Easier

9:00AM-11:20AM Sunday, May 27

Cendri Hutcherson, University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada

Programming is increasingly becoming an indispensable part of the psychological scientist’s toolkit. This workshop introduces basic concepts and best practices in programming, using Matlab and its free open-source alternative Octave. Topics include programming and analyzing experiments; tips for writing elegant, readable code; and strategies and solutions for testing and debugging.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

Latent Variables and Mixture Models for Analyzing Social Science and Behavioral Data

9:00AM-12:50PM Sunday, May 27

Irini Moustaki, The London School of Economics and Political Science, United Kingdom

The workshop will provide an introduction to the topic of latent-variable modeling and structural equation modeling. Emphasis will be given to some more recent advances that combine mixture models and latent variables for modeling data from complex populations, for classification, and for detecting aberrant responses. The workshop will focus on explaining the models and their applications in social and behavioral sciences.

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)

State-of-the-Art Methods for Handling Missing Data Responsibly in SPSS or R

9:00AM-12:50PM Sunday, May 27

Terrence D. Jorgensen, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The first half of this workshop is a 2-hour foundational lecture on missing-data mechanisms, the failure of ad hoc methods, and conceptual introductions to modern methods (multiple imputation and maximum likelihood). The second half of this workshop includes interactive software demonstrations in SPSS and R.  Workshop materials can be downloaded from: http://www.uva.nl/profile/t.d.jorgensen

Cosponsored by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and the Society of Multivariate Experimental Psychology (SMEP)