Cross-Cutting Theme Programs

These programs cut across psychological science’s sub-disciplines, feature high profile speakers, and seek to inspire an intellectual event, creating networking opportunities for a broad audience as they attend and discuss presentations

The Convention program includes three invited cross-cutting theme programs, scheduled on Friday and Saturday. These programs cut across psychological science’s sub-disciplines, feature high profile speakers, and seek to inspire an intellectual event, creating networking opportunities for a broad audience as they attend and discuss presentations. Theme programs are accompanied by submitted posters related to the theme topic, which are scheduled together in a poster session to encourage a continued dialogue among attendees and speakers.

Science of Inequality

Katie A. McLaughlin, University of Washington
Ezemenari M. Obasi, University of Houston
Deanna M. Barch, Washington University in St. Louis
Keith Payne, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Johannes Haushofer, Princeton University

In the 21st century, the topic of inequality has taken center stage in the media, in politics, on college campuses, and in the boardroom. Scientists continue to explore the conditions that drive inequality, factors that shape our perceptions of inequality, and the short- and long-term consequences of inequality on the brain and behavior.  This cross-cutting theme program considers the science of inequality from a range of perspectives, from how poverty and other forms of early adversity shape brain development, to the physiological and psychological impact of stress and discrimination on behavior and health, to the ways that conditions of scarcity influence cognition, emotion, and decision making in the short term, potentially reinforcing conditions that sustain economic inequality and health disparities.

My Truth or Yours: The Science of Reality Monitoring

Jon S. Simons, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
Donna Rose Addis, The University of Auckland, New Zealand
Jacqueline D. Woolley, The University of Texas at Austin
Steven A. Sloman, Brown University

How do people distinguish reality from fantasy, the perceived from the imagined? How do these abilities develop over a lifetime, and how do they inform our sense of identity and influence our decision making? How do deficits in reality monitoring manifest in health and disease, and what are the individual and societal implications of errors? Through talks, posters, and discussions, this theme program will bring together researchers from cognitive, clinical, developmental, neuroscience, and social perspectives to address these questions.

Technology and the Human Experience: Shaping Thoughts, Feelings, Development, and Interactions

Adam H. Gazzaley,University of California, San Francisco
Sara J. Czaja, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Jonathan Gratch, University of Southern California
Gloria Mark, University of California, Irvine
Justine Cassell, Carnegie Mellon University

Technology influences every dimension of modern human experience – how people think, feel, and interact – and its impact promises to increase at an exponential rate in the years ahead. This symposium examines technology and the human experience, from its impact on attention and stress, to facilitating healthy aging, to the insight it can provide for understanding human cognition, emotion, and behavior. Five prominent scientists working at the intersection of technology and psychology will present current research and future trends that promise to affect the study of human behavior in the decades to come.