Currently browsing "Judgment"

How We Explain Things Shapes What We Think Is Right

Explaining why people give roses for Valentine’s Day in terms of inherent traits (roses are pretty) instead of context (advertisers promote roses) predisposes us to assume the practice is good. ... More>

Science of Implicit Bias to Be Focus of US Law Enforcement Training

The US Department of Justice will integrate findings from psychological science into new training curricula to combat implicit bias among law enforcement agents and prosecutors. ... More>

Who’s the Better Judge of a Good Idea: You or Your Boss?

A new study turns to professional circus performers to investigate whether management or creatives are better at assessing what an audience wants. ... More>

How Collectivism Protects Against Contagious Fear

People who reported greater perceived risk of Ebola infection were more likely to report xenophobic attitudes, but feeling a sense of belonging and connection to others can mitigate this link. ... More>

When Looking Like a Leader Derails the Group

Experiments show that people who display the powerful, confident body language associated with leadership tend to dominate decision making—even when their ideas were entirely incorrect. ... More>