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Psychological Scientists Elected to American Academy of Arts & Sciences

This is a photo of a stack of academic books.A total of 11 psychological scientists, all of whom are APS Fellows, have been elected as members of the 2016 class of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences. The academy is “one of the country’s oldest learned societies and independent policy research centers, convening leaders from the academic, business, and government sectors,” and includes 4,600 members from many disciplines and professions.

Of the newest class of members, John D. Gabrieli was elected to the Mathematical and Physical Sciences class, Neurosciences, Cognitive Sciences, and Behavioral Biology section.

Elections to the Social Sciences class, Social and Developmental Psychology and Education section, include Michelene T.H. Chi, Jennifer L. Eberhardt, Jeffrey L. Elman, John T. Monahan, and Past APS Board Member Elke U. Weber. Gerd Gigerenzer was named a Foreign Honorary Member in this same…

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Kavli HUMAN Project to Host Town Hall Meeting in Chicago

PAFF_042716_KavliHUMANProject_newsfeatureA massively ambitious new research collaboration may soon become psychological science’s answer to the Human Genome Project. The goal of the Kavli HUMAN Project, a new collaboration between New York University’s (NYU) Institute for the Interdisciplinary Study of Decision Making (IISDM) and the Kavli Foundation, is no less than to quantify every major biobehavioral factor that plays a role in shaping humanity. By comprehensively studying a cohort of 10,000 New Yorkers over the course of 20 years, the project hopes to expand the scope of social science research capabilities — just as the Human Genome Project revolutionized the field of genetics.

New technology is now allowing scientists to collect data on a scale previously unimaginable: The Kavli HUMAN Project, under the direction of APS Fellow Paul W. Glimcher, wants to harness this capability to allow researchers to quantify the complex…

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Neuroimaging Highlights Emotion Perception and Memory

This is a photo of family photographs hanging on a clothesline in front of a cloudy sky.Perception often is thought of in terms of sensory stimuli — what we see, hear, and smell — but it extends beyond the five senses, including complex function of emotional perception. We also can turn this perception inward, toward our own appraisal of an emotional stimulus.

Thus, emotional perception can be split into two categories depending on the direction of attention: Focusing our attention outward to stimuli in our external environments is known as external perceptual orienting (EPO), while interoceptive self-orienting (ISO) is the opposite — directing our attention toward our own…

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Ellen Langer to be Honored at Liberty Science Center Genius Gala

APS James McKeen Cattell Fellow Ellen Langer is among four leading figures in science and technology being honored on May 20th at the Liberty Science Center Genius Gala, an annual celebration of science and creativity. The recipient of four distinguished scientist awards and a Guggenheim Fellowship joins world-renowned architect Frank Gehry, paleontologist Jack Horner, and astrophysicist Kip Thorne among the 2016 honorees announced by the nonprofit Liberty Science Center (LSC), an interactive museum in Jersey City, New Jersey.

LSC is honoring Langer — a Harvard social psychologist — in recognition of her achievements as the “mother of mindfulness.” Langer has written extensively on the illusion of control, aging, stress, decision-making, health, and of course, mindfulness. She is particularly well-known for her findings on the power of social cues to make us feel and act younger and healthier than our chronological age. In…

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Brain Reconciles Sight and Sound in Different Ways

This is an illustration of sound waves approaching a person's ear.A new study from psychology researchers at UCLA provides insights into how the brain combines sound and vision. The research suggests that there is not one sole mechanism in the brain that governs how much our senses work together to process information.

Among the implications of the study: It might not be as easy as many people had assumed to categorize the way in which we perceive and learn.

“We should be cautious not to make blanket statements about how we process information, like ‘I’m a visual learner,’” said Ladan Shams, an associate professor of psychology in the UCLA College and senior author of the research. “That’s not necessarily true across the board. For example, your brain may combine sights and sounds a lot in one task — watching TV,…

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