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Volume 35, Issue6November/December 2022
The November/December Observer: Charging Up the Creative Battery
From the promise of electric brain stimulation to resurgent interest in psychedelics, psychological science is revealing a deeper understanding of many aspects of creativity.
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Presidential Column

Alison Gopnik
University of California, Berkeley
APS President 2022 - 2023
All columns

In this Issue:
Children, Creativity, and the Real Key to Intelligence

About the Observer

Published 6 times per year by the Association for Psychological Science, the Observer educates and informs on matters affecting the research, academic, and applied disciplines of psychology; promotes the scientific values of APS members; reports on issues of international interest to the psychological science community; and provides a vehicle for the dissemination on information about APS.

APS members receive the Observer newsletter and may access the online archive going back to 1988.

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    Myths and Misinformation

    How does misinformation spread and how do we combat it? Psychological science sheds light on the mechanisms underlying misinformation and ‘fake news.’

Featured


Up Front


  • Children, Creativity, and the Real Key to Intelligence

    APS President Alison Gopnik writes that the contrast between the reasoning of creative 4-year-olds and predictable artificial intelligence may be a key to understanding how human intelligence works—and how it might interact with the rapidly evolving technology.

  • Research Briefs

    Recent highlights from APS journals articles on work identity, investigating the cross-category affect, graduate training, cross-cultural generalizability, and much more.

Government Relations


APS Spotlight


Practice


First Person


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