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Observer Article

Portrait of Self-Control as a Young Process

Stereotypes portray the teen brain as an out-of-control car with “no brakes, no steering wheel, and only an accelerator,” says APS Fellow BJ Casey. Research shows that teenagers take risks because reward centers develop more quickly than control centers in their brains. But changes in the adolescent brain ultimately help prepare teens to become independent of their parents. APS Fellow Ruth Feldman, Clancy Blair, and Angela L. Duckworth also speak about self-regulation across the lifespan in APS President Nancy Eisenberg’s 2015 Presidential Symposium. ... More>

Beyond Simple Models of Self-Control

The adolescent brain is more “plastic” than it will ever be again and capable of remarkable adaptability in light of the many challenges that this developmental phase brings. Yet it […]... More>

Self-Control Stategies for School-Age Children

What strategies can children use to facilitate self-control? First, they can choose their physical or social circumstances or change them to their advantage. Next, they can selectively attend to particular […]... More>

Young Children’s Self-Control and the Health and Wealth of Their Nation

Longitudinal data collected from thousands of participants from New Zealand and the United Kingdom show that childhood measures of self-discipline predict everything from personal income to the pace of physiological […]... More>

The Paradox of Effort