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Observer Article

Portrait of Self-Control as a Young Process

Stereotypes portray the teen brain as an out-of-control car with “no brakes, no steering wheel, and only an accelerator,” says APS Fellow BJ Casey. Research shows that teenagers take risks because reward centers develop more quickly than control centers in their brains. But changes in the adolescent brain ultimately help prepare teens to become independent of their parents. APS Fellow Ruth Feldman, Clancy Blair, and Angela L. Duckworth also speak about self-regulation across the lifespan in APS President Nancy Eisenberg’s 2015 Presidential Symposium. ... More>


At What Age Does Hard Work Add a Shine to Lousy Prizes?

Putting in a lot of effort to earn a reward makes unappealing prizes more attractive to kindergarteners, but not to preschoolers, new findings show. ... More>


Making Sense of Self-Regulation in Early Childhood

The effect of parental supportive emotion socialization on internalizing symptoms (IS) in early childhood is moderated by child executive function (EF). For children with low EF, there is a negative […]... More>


Toddlers and Touchscreens: A Science in Development

A new study launched by APS Board Member Annette Karmiloff-Smith and Tim Smith of Birkbeck, University of London, will investigate how digital technology affects early child development across various domains. ... More>


Kids of Helicopter Parents Are Sputtering Out