Psychological Science in the Public Interest Editorial Board

Editor

Valerie F. Reyna, Cornell University, Department of Human Development

Managing Editor

Torrance Gloss, Association for Psychological Science

Advisory Board

Mahzarin R. Banaji, Harvard University, Department of Psychology

Stephen J. Ceci, Cornell University, Department of Human Development

Uta Frith, University College London, Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience

Morton Ann Gernsbacher, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Psychology

John Jemmott, III, University of Pennsylvania, Annenberg School for Communication

Daniel Kahneman, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs

Elizabeth F. Loftus, University of California, Irvine, Department of Psychology and Social Behavior

Marcus E. Raichle, Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Radiology

Henry L. Roediger, III, Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology

Daniel L. Schacter, Harvard University, Department of Psychology

Richard Shiffrin, Indiana University, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Keith E. Stanovich, University of Toronto, Department of Development and Applied Psychology

Laurence Steinberg, Temple University, Department of Psychology

Cass R. Sunstein, Harvard Law School

Wendy M. Williams, Cornell University, Department of Human Development

Christopher Wolfe, Miami University, Department of Psychology

 

 

Valerie F. Reyna

Director of the Human Neuroscience Institute and Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University, with appointments in Psychology, Cognitive Science, and Neuroscience; Co-Director Cornell Magnetic Resonance Imaging Facility; Co-Director, Center for Behavioral Economics and Decision Research; Professor in the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical School

Valerie Reyna

Valerie Reyna’s research integrates brain and behavioral approaches to understand and improve judgment, decision making, and memory across the life span. Her recent work has focused on the neuroscience of risky decision making and its implications for health and well-being, especially in adolescents; applications of cognitive models and artificial intelligence to improving understanding of genetics (e.g., in breast cancer); and medical and legal decision making (e.g., about jury awards, medication decisions, and adolescent culpability). She is a developer of fuzzy-trace theory, a model of the relation between mental representations and decision making that has been widely applied in law, medicine, and public health.

Reyna is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the oldest and most prestigious honorary society in experimental psychology. She is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a former President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making, among other national leadership roles in scholarly organizations. Read More…

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Mahzarin R. Banaji

Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University and George A. and Helen Dunham Cowan Chair in Human Dynamics at the Santa Fe Institute

Mahzarin Banaji

Mahzarin Banaji received her PhD from Ohio State University and did postdoctoral work at the University of Washington. From 1986-2001 she taught at Yale University where she was Reuben Post Halleck Professor of Psychology. Since then she has been Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University. She also served as the first Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard from 2002-2008.

In 2005, Banaji was elected fellow of the Society for Experimental Psychologists, in 2008 to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2009 was named Herbert A. Simon Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. She is also a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (of which she was President) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. From 2011-2015, Banaji will also serve as George A. and Helen Dunham Cowan Chair in Human Dynamics at the Santa Fe Institute. Read More…

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Stephen Ceci

Helen L. Carr Chaired Professor of Developmental Psychology and SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University

Stephen Ceci

Ceci is the Helen L. Carr Chaired Professor of Developmental Psychology and SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Human Development. He currently holds courtesy appointments in the psychology departments at the University College London and the University of Kent.

Currently, with Wendy Williams, Steve conducts a major project examining sex differences in cognitive performance, which has culminated this year in several new peer-reviewed articles (e.g., Psychological Science in the Public Interest (second most read article for November, 2014) and popular outlets such as an editorial in the New York Times and an article in Scientific American Mind) and chapters.

Steve continues to develop his bio-ecological theory of intelligence, and to publish articles dealing with cognitive development (e.g., memory development). Wendy Williams and he have three large-scale national analyses of academic mentorship, hiring, and authorship issues that are currently under various stages of review, including revise & resubmit. Read More…

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Uta Frith

Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Development at UCL (University College London) Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience and Visiting Professor at the University of Aarhus

Uta Frith

I am Emeritus Professor of Cognitive Development at UCL (University College London) Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience. I am also a Visiting Professor at the University of Aarhus. Amongst other affiliations I am a Fellow of the Royal Society, the British Academy, the German Academy Leopoldina, and a Foreign Member of the National Academy of Sciences. Throughout my career I have been developing a . My two favourite disorders are autism and dyslexia, because they are puzzling and endlessly fascinating and also because they promise to give us a glimpse of the hidden machinery of the mind. Using methods from experimental psychology I have been investigating a number of high-level cognitive processes to find out whether their failure might result in the core features of autism and dyslexia. My aim still is to discover the underlying cognitive causes of these disorders and to link them, on the one hand to behaviour, and on the other hand to the brain. A bigger aim is to make this research relevant to the education of people with developmental disorders and to contribute to a better quality of their everyday life by a better understanding of their problems. Read More…

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Morton Ann Gernsbacher

Vilas Research Professor and the Sir Frederic C. Bartlett Professor of Psychology at University of Wisconsin-Madison

M.A.Gernsbacher

Gernsbacher received her Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1983, and was an assistant, associate, and full professor at the University of Oregon, from 1983 to 1992, when she then joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she is a Vilas Research Professor and the Sir Frederic C. Bartlett Professor of Psychology. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Society for Experimental Psychologists, and the American Educational Research Association.

Gernsbacher has received a Research Career Development Award and a Senior Research Fellowship from the National Institutes of Health, a Fulbright Research Scholar Award, a Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Texas at Dallas, a James McKeen Cattell Foundation Fellowship, the George A. Miller Award, a Professional Opportunities for Women Award from the National Science Foundation, a Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the Society for Text and Discourse, and Distinguished Service to Psychological Science Award from APA. In 2013, she received the Ernest R. Hilgard Lifetime Achievement Award. Read More…

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John Jemmott, III

Kenneth B. Clark Professor of Communication and Psychiatry at The Annenberg School for Communication

John Jemmott

John B. Jemmott III is the Kenneth B. Clark Professor of Communication and Psychiatry at The Annenberg School for Communication. Professor Jemmott holds joint faculty appointments at Annenberg and in Psychiatry in the Perelman School of Medicine. He is also the director of the Center for Health Behavior and Communication Research at the Annenberg School.

Jemmott is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Society for Behavioral Medicine. He has published more than 100 articles and book chapters, and since 1988 has received numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health to conduct research designed to develop and test theory-based, contextually appropriate HIV/STD risk reduction interventions for a variety of populations in the United States and sub-Saharan Africa.

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Daniel Kahneman

Senior Scholar and Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University; Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University; and a Fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Daniel Kahneman

Daniel Kahneman is a Senior Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is also Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at the Woodrow Wilson School, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton University, and a fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Kahneman has held the position of professor of psychology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem (1970-1978), the University of British Columbia (1978-1986), and the University of California, Berkeley (1986-1994). Kahneman is a member of the National Academy of Science, the Philosophical Society, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the American Psychological Association, and the Econometric Society. He has been the recipient of many awards, among them the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (1982) and the Grawemeyer Prize (2002), both jointly with Amos Tversky, the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (1995), the Hilgard Award for Career Contributions to General Psychology (1995), the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2002), the Lifetime Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (2007), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2013). Kahneman holds honorary degrees from numerous Universities.

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Elizabeth Loftus

Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Irvine. She holds positions in the law school and two departments: Psychology and Social Behavior, and also Criminology, Law & Society

Elizabeth Loftus

Loftus is Distinguished Professor at the University of California, Irvine. She holds positions in the law school and two departments: Psychology and Social Behavior, and also Criminology, Law & Society. Elizabeth Loftus studies human memory. Her experiments reveal how memories can be changed by things that we are told. Facts, ideas, suggestions and other post-event information can modify our memories. The legal field, so reliant on memories, has been a significant application of the memory research. Loftus is also interested in psychology and law, more generally.

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Marcus Raichle

Professor of Radiology, Neurology, Neurobiology and Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St Louis

Marcus Raichle

Marcus E. Raichle, a neurologist, is a Professor of Radiology, Neurology, Neurobiology and Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St Louis.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, The Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He and his colleagues have made outstanding contributions to the study of human brain function through the development and use of positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Their landmark study (Nature, 1988) described the first integrated strategy for the design, execution and interpretation of functional brain images. It represented 17 years of work developing the components of this strategy (e.g., rapid, repeat measurements of blood flow with PET; stereotaxic localization; imaging averaging; and, a cognitive subtraction strategy). Another seminal study led to the discovery that blood flow and glucose utilization change more than oxygen consumption in the active brain (Science, 1988) causing tissue oxygen to vary with brain activity.  This discovery provided the physiological basis for subsequent development fMRI and caused researchers to reconsider the dogma that brain uses oxidative phosphorylation exclusively to fuel its functional activities. Read More…

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Henry Roediger, III

James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis

Henry Roediger

Henry L. Roediger, III is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor at Washington University in St. Louis. He was born in Roanoke, Virginia, immediately nicknamed Roddy, and spent most of his youth in Danville, Virginia before leaving for high school. He graduated as commander of the corps of cadets from Riverside Military Academy in Gainesville, Georgia in 1965 and then attended Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, graduating magna cum laudae with a B.A in Psychology in 1969. He worked primarily with David G. Elmes as an undergraduate and they published several papers (and later, two books) together. Roediger went on to graduate school at Yale University, working with Robert Crowder and Endel Tulving, and received his Ph.D. in 1973.

Roediger became an assistant professor at Purdue University in 1973 and spent 15 years on the faculty there, except for three years as visiting professor at the University of Toronto. In 1988 he was appointed Lynette S. Autrey Professor of Psychology at Rice University and enjoyed his 8 years in Houston. In 1996 he left to become chair of the Psychology Department at Washington University in St. Louis for 8 years, stepping down in 2004. That same year he was appointed Dean of Academic Planning in Arts and Sciences, a position he continues to hold. Read More…

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Daniel Schacter

William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Psychology at Harvard University

Daniel Schacter

Daniel L. Schacter is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Psychology at  Harvard University. Schacter received his B.A. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1974 and received his PhD from the University of Toronto in 1981, where he studied with Endel Tulving. Schacter then served as director of the Unit for Memory Disorders at the University of Toronto for the next six years. He joined the psychology department at the University of Arizona in 1987 as an Associate Professor, with promotion to Professor in 1989. In 1991, he was appointed Professor at Harvard University, and served as Chair of the department from 1995-2005.

Schacter’s research explores the relation between conscious and unconscious forms of memory, the nature of memory distortions, how individuals use memory to imagine possible future events, enhancement of online learning, as well as the effects of aging on memory. Schacter and his many collaborators have published over 350 articles and chapters on these and related topics. Read More…

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Richard Shiffrin

Distinguished Professor and Luther Dana Waterman Professor at Indiana University

Richard Shiffrin

Richard M. Shiffrin heads the Memory and Perception Laboratory in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University–the MAPLAB website gives information about present and past lab members and projects. He is a Distinguished Professor and Luther Dana Waterman Professor and has additional appointments in Cognitive Science (which he founded in 1988) and Statistics.

His research interests are quite broad, more or less covering the fields of Cognitive Science and Psychology. Generally speaking the research involves empirical studies and quantitative and computational modeling of the results. Current projects are generally tailored toward the interests of the graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the lab, and the need to carry out research funded by external grants (presently from NSF and AFOSR). Read More…

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Keith Stanovich

Emeritus Professor of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the University of Toronto

K.Stanovich

Keith E. Stanovich is Emeritus Professor of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the University of Toronto and former Canada Research Chair of Applied Cognitive Science. He is the author of over 200 scientific articles and seven books. He received his B.A. degree in psychology from Ohio State University in 1973 and his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1977.

Stanovich’s book, What Intelligence Tests Miss, received the 2010 Grawemeyer Award in Education. He is the only two-time winner of the Albert J. Harris Award from the International Reading Association for influential articles on reading. In 1995 he was elected to the Reading Hall of Fame as the youngest member of that honorary society. In 1996 he was given the Oscar Causey Award from the National Reading Conference for contributions to research, in 1997 he was given the Sylvia Scribner Award from the American Educational Research Association, and in 2000 he received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Read More…

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Laurence Steinberg

Distinguished University Professor and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology at Temple University

L.Steinberg

Laurence Steinberg is the Distinguished University Professor and Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology at Temple University. He received his A.B. in Psychology from Vassar College and his Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Cornell University. Steinberg is a former President of the Society for Research on Adolescence, former Director of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Adolescent Development and Juvenile Justice, and a member of the MacArthur Foundation’s Research Network on Law and Neuroscience. An internationally recognized expert on psychological development during adolescence, Steinberg’s research has focused on a range of topics in the study of contemporary adolescence, including adolescent brain development, risk-taking and decision-making, parent-adolescent relationships, school-year employment, high school reform, and juvenile justice. He served as a member of the National Academies’ Board on Children, Youth, and Families and chaired the Academies’ Committee on the Science of Adolescence. Read More…

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Cass Sunstein

Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard University

Cass Sunstein

Cass R. Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations.

Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014). He is now working on group decision making and various projects on the idea of liberty.

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Wendy Williams

Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University

W.Williams

Wendy M. Williams is Professor in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University, where she studies the development, assessment, training, and societal implications of intelligence. She holds Ph.D. and Master’s degrees in psychology from Yale University, a Master’s in physical anthropology from Yale, and a B.A. in English and biology from Columbia University, awarded cum laude with special distinction. In the fall of 2009, Williams founded (and now directs) the Cornell Institute for Women in Science (CIWS), a National Institutes of Health-funded research and outreach center that studies and promotes the careers of women scientists. She also heads “Thinking Like A Scientist,” a national education-outreach program funded by the National Science Foundation, which is designed to encourage traditionally underrepresented groups (girls, people of color, and people from disadvantaged backgrounds) to pursue science education and careers. In the past, Williams directed the joint Harvard-Yale Practical and Creative Intelligence for School Project, and was Co-Principal Investigator for a six-year, $1.4 million Army Research Institute grant to study practical intelligence and success at leadership. Read More…

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Christopher Wolfe

Professor of Psychology; Director of Graduate Studies in Psychology; and Co-Director of the Doris Bergen Center for Human Development, Learning & Technology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio

Christopher Wolfe

Wolfe is Professor of Psychology, Miami University, Oxford Ohio; Director of Graduate Studies in Psychology; and Co-Director of the Doris Bergen Center for Human Development, Learning & Technology. Former President of the Society for Computers in Psychology, he has published a book, book chapters, and peer-reviewed journal articles on cognition, technology, STEM education, and health. He was a developer of the highly successful science education program and magazine Dragonfly, which inspired a television show on PBS. He has been a Primary Investigator or Co-PI on 20 grants totaling over $4 million, receiving federal grant funding from the National Cancer Institute, U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education Sciences, and the National Science Foundation; and corporate and foundation funding from Proctor & Gamble, Rise Inc., and Blind Squirrels.

His research concerns higher-order cognition, the way people think, reason, solve problems, make decisions, and develop arguments. Currently, he is conducting research on how people make medical decisions pertaining to genetic mutations and breast cancer risk. Read More…

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